Global Scan

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Global Scan

Five apps that can help you keep an eye on what your kids are doing

Are you a frustrated parent who can't get your kid to answer your phone and text messages? Never fear, the Ignore No More app is here ... along with a few other mobile tools for parents. And if you're a fan of Nutella, you just might want to stock up fast. Also, did you know the situation in Iraq has the US helping a group it labels as terrorists? That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An ancient lost Mayan city reappears in Mexico

The Mayan civilization thrived more than a thousand years ago. Many of its cities simply disappeared as jungle overtook them. One of them was found decades ago and then lost again, until now. We also report on why women may be bearing the brunt of Ebola's attack in West Africa, and how Syrian cyber-warriors are using viral clickbait to trap enemies of the Syrian regime. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Russia demands that Bulgaria treat Soviet memorials with a little respect

Monuments showing heroic Soviet soldiers dot many of the former USSR satellite countries. And since the end of the Cold War, they have been refashioned by activists into political statements, infuriating Russian officials. In Africa, social media networks have been spreading a folk 'cure' for Ebola. And the Israeli government has kept independent human rights investigators out of Gaza. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is how many times British cops fired guns all of last year: 3

Updated

As the debate over gun control — and, now, the use of force by police — rages in the US and elsewhere, Britain offers a stark contrast. Police there rarely carry guns, fire them or kill anyone. Meanwhile, Beijing is getting machines that inspire people to both recycle and ride public transit. And Ebola is killing Liberians who don't even have the disease, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Nicaraguans are told to eat lizards — because of a drought

Nicaragua is suffering under a terrible drought, which is reducing food stocks and raising food prices. That's made it increasingly difficult for Nicaraguans to have an adequate diet. So government officials are encouraging Nicaraguans to raise and eat lizards. Meanwhile, if you've seen a popup ad recently, the man behind them wants you to know he's sorry. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US says the crisis for Yazidis in Iraq is over — but the UN disagrees

Earlier this week, the US considered the possibility of sending American troops to rescue members of the Yazidi minority trapped by ISIS militants on Mount Sinjar in Iraq. Now, President Obama says the crisis has passed ... but others aren't so sure. And if you think women's rights are relatively new, guess again. And we explain why Ferguson, Missouri seems like a war zone, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Are alleged ISIS passports a hoax?

When militants declared an Islamic Caliphate in Iraq and Syria, social media buzzed with photos and claims they were printing 11,000 passports. But a closer look at those photos suggests they are fake. Meanwhile, US Marines land in Iraq to scope out a mission to rescue people trapped by ISIS, and South Africa has its own humanitarian rescue, but for rhinos, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Canada will send an experimental Ebola vaccine to Africa

The Ebola crisis in West Africa has challenged health workers and scientists, because there is no vaccine. But an experimental vaccine from Canada has been offered up to potentially help 1,000 people. But who gets it? Meanwhile, a French community south of Paris is sticking by an old and hateful name. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Groupon, step aside. Now, you can fly like a billionaire — on the cheap

The Internet makes all things possible, like finding and hiring a private jet that just happens to be going your way ... for a song. Meanwhile, Delhi police are urging citizens to use their smartphones to catch abusive police. And an "e-coyote" explains why he wants the clients he smuggles across the US-Mexico border to post on Facebook, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Dennis Rodman brings his brand of basketball diplomacy back to North Korea

Dennis Rodman's controversial relationship with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un turned another page this week. The former NBA star was in North Korea this week to select and train a North Korean basketball team that will take part in an exhibition game in honor of Kim's birthday. Plus Egyptian activists are thrown in jail and elves — yes, elves — halt a highway project in Iceland, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

My affair? Next question...

François Hollande has long been under pressure for his policies. Now, he's under pressure around the details of an affair. Perhaps he needs a lesson from Abdul Saboor, praised as "Afghanistan's most honest man" in a country known for corruption. And is a woman on a swing a bit enticing? Some in Saudi Arabia say yes and want to stop it. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

In one particular part of Beijing, stray cats are more than welcome

If you're a stray cat in Beijing, the Forbidden City is the place for you. The museums there use stray cats to protect their artifacts from rats and other vermin. In Ukraine, they're less interested in stray cats and more interested in Bitcoins — the cryptocurrency may be a quick way to support the protesters who are still camped in Independence Square.

Global Scan

At these Paris hotels, it's up to you how much you pay

Priceline offers to let you name your own price for your hotel, but it's not quite literal. A group of Paris hotels are letting you stay at their hotel and pay as much as you want when you check out. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, and protests are mounting around the world. Plus autocorrect — it's much more complex than you might think. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A Nobel Peace Prize for legalizing marijuana — why not?

Uruguay made waves when it legalized the possession, consumption and manufacturing of marijuana. Now, the president has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. A 12-year-old discovers a new species of giant jellyfish. And just what would it take for New York City to host a winter Olympics? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.