Global Scan

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Global Scan

This 'depressed' polar bear won't be getting a new home after all

Arturo, the "world's most depressed" polar bear was supposed to be heading to a better life in Canada — at least that's what activists wanted. But now they're hearing he's too unwell to travel anywhere. Russia passes yet another law that critics say will limit Internet freedom. And a British man found he's been paying for cable service he canceled four years ago, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

At these Paris hotels, it's up to you how much you pay

Priceline offers to let you name your own price for your hotel, but it's not quite literal. A group of Paris hotels are letting you stay at their hotel and pay as much as you want when you check out. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, and protests are mounting around the world. Plus autocorrect — it's much more complex than you might think. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An experiment in crowd-sourced news for China 'disappears' at the hands of government censors

China's not known for its press freedom — though its citizens are voracious consumers of news. A new site, Cenci, had taken the country's journalism world by storm ... until censors decided to make it invisible. Meanwhile in Boston, you can buy soup in bite-size, edible balls. It's a Harvard researcher's idea to cut plastic waste. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Social posts from Jihadi fighters make the war in Syria sound almost fun

From the look of their social media posts, British Islamists fighting to oust Syria's government and impose Islamic law are having a terrific time. Even the martyrs seem to be smiling. Also, you might want to thank some immigrants the next time you sip your favorite California wine. And the autobiography of famed singer Morrissey apparently was too gay for the US. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

New clashes in Kiev, reviewing the guest list for Syria's peace talks, and Russian fears of 'black widows'

The situation in Kiev remains volatile, with protesters in favor of closer ties with the European Union burning buses and hurling projectiles at police. And planned Syria peace talks in Geneva this week were nearly derailed by a UN invitation to include Iran. And Russia is looking for four women it is worried may be planning suicide attacks at the Sochi Olympics. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The conflict over Ukraine now reaches into space

Russia has announced it will stop selling rocket engines to the US, as the tit-for-tit sanctions over Ukraine increase. That will hurt America's ability to loft satellites into orbit and support the International Space Station. Elsewhere, Nigerian vigilante groups form to fight against Boko Haram and a religious ritual in Indonesia involves anonymous sex, in today's Global Scan.