Global Scan

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Global Scan

The 'Hands up, don't shoot' gesture from Ferguson moves to Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, pro-democracy protests are being confronted by an unprecedented level of police force — and that's led them to adopt a gesture that would look familiar to anyone who saw photos of protests in Ferguson, Missouri, last month. Meanwhile, scientists think they have developed a new solar power collector that will be more affordable and efficient. And North Korea's Kim Jong-un takes ill — in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

These are the seven countries the US military has bombed in the last three years

US officials launched an air attack on ISIS rebels in Syria this week, making the war-torn Middle East country the seventh state — at least — to see US airstrike since 2011. Meanwhile, an African nation torn by Ebola is agreeing to halt logging in exchange for development aid. And in Iraq, the nation's Kurdish minority is looking at what it has achieved — with high hopes for its future.

Global Scan

Greeks wonder who was buried in this huge tomb 2300 years ago

It is the largest ancient burial site in Greece and, just a month after its announcement, it has brought new life to two small villages 60 miles east of Thessaloniki. But who was important enough to be buried there? Meanwhile in India, when some families are planning a wedding, the first to-do is to hire a marriage detective. And Russian President Putin decides to intervene in a children's show, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

European youth have started the #BloodBucketChallenge

After the success of the Ice Bucket Challenge that swept YouTube, European young people are hoping for viral success with a campaign to bring world attention back to the conflict on Ukraine's eastern border. Meanwhile, killing is the subject of newly-published scientific research. In this case, the killers, though, are chimps. And a Chinese tennis star retires in her 30s, having brought tennis and a bit of sports freedom to her home country, in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Now you can have airline food without leaving the ground

Frequent fliers at least get points for suffering through airline cuisine. Soon Germans will get the option of having it delivered to their homes. And what does a business class meal cost on the ground? About $12. Newly-released files from Britain's National Archives confirm that the country's WWII spies had to pass a seduction test by "special agent" Fifi. And 50 South Koreans will experience an oxymoron — competitive relaxation. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

MIT researchers create a robo-cheetah that runs and jumps off-leash

It's not much of a looker when it comes to feline curves, but MIT's robotic cheetah sure can run. It is novel in both its motors and the math that calculates how hard it springs across uneven terrain. In Scotland, bankers are preparing for the worst — a run on banks if Scots vote "yes" to separate from Britain on Thursday. And we look at the sexy brewing device for coffee that was a favorite of James Bond and is coming back into fashion. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just how big is that comet the European Space Agency is going to land on?

Out in space, comets don't seem that big compared to planets and all. But this chunk of rock and ice would rival the tallest mountains we know. Some have even created photos showing how it would tower over Los Angeles. Meanwhile in Australia, a Pizza Hut makes a major PR gaffe when it decides to throw in a free pet with every large pizza order. And the American-raised son of a terrorist decides to tell his story. All in this edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A new study identifies a promising technique to reverse male infertility. And it involves mice

Infertility in men can be an emotionally-difficult problem — and one that has been largely untreatable. But a new therapy being tested in mice is showing promising results. Plus, cell phone recordings tell of the final moments for South Korean teenagers caught in the ferry disaster. And a German exchange student is killed in America. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scandinavians, for the first time, are joining the jihad

Scandinavia is known for its commitment to civil and human rights, its government services and its equality. But it's also becoming a source of jihadi fighters in Syria. Pro-Russian militants in Ukraine have secured a huge cache of weapons. And a white man and his black puppet are creating candid talk on race in South Africa. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

That monkey selfie? The US government says it belongs to all of us

This cute selfie taken by a monkey who happened on a photographer's camera does not belong to the photographer. So say US regulators, who explain their reasoning. Meanwhile, China's effort to stop the desert's advance using trees has hit a snag. And chalk up another marketing fail — a lingerie line with the same name as a terrorist group. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

What might have happened if Kennedy had lived?

The Cuban missile crisis had an epilogue that few know — the Kennedy administration was in secret talks with Cuba around a reconciliation. In current news, several women in London have been held in slavery for years, Europe contemplates its own NSA-proof cloud computing facility, and we visit Ford Nation — the Toronto mayor's fans who insist they'll vote for him again. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.