Global Scan

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Global Scan

ISIS thanks the Pentagon for its errant weapon airdrop

The Pentagon has been stepping up its efforts to reinforce Kurdish forces in Iraq and Syria as they battle ISIS terrorists. An airdrop in Kobane this week was meant to bolster them at a crucial time, unfortunately some of the supplies went off target. Plus a look at how humans came to eat dairy and a prohibition on kissing at a Zimbabwe university. Those stories in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A computer saves a Russian man from a bear attack

Encounters between hungry bears and people are increasingly common in Russia. But one encounter had an unexpected twist — and suggests a new use for that outdated computer. Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, the city's top leader says the city's poor can't be trusted with the right to vote. And Rwanda starts screening Americans for Ebola. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Forget the apple. Saudi Arabia is offering its best teachers a Bimmer

Saudi Arabia has a plan to reward its best teachers with thousands of dollars and luxury cars. Student rewards come next. Elsewhere, a Russian monastery hopes to solve the country's mozzarella shortage. And a three-year-old movie gives you a an accurate sense of what it is like fighting the Ebola outbreak. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Remember WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange? If not, he's got a T-shirt for you

Julian Assange has been staying in the Ecuadorean embassy in London for months, largely out of the spotlight. But he's trying to put his face back in front of people — literally. On T-shirts. Meanwhile, we take your questions about Ebola and, in Canada, the dollar has fallen to a new five-year low, making Canadian goods inexpensive. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Italy's army enters the marijuana business

Italy recently allowed the chronically sick to purchase marijuana for medicinal purposes. But the country's supply has been severely constrained. Now the army is stepping in. Meanwhile, in Canada, the elk supply is anything but constrained and that's a problem. And President Barack Obama may have to ally with Syria's Bashar al-Assad.

Global Scan

Downton Abbey's pooch has a problem — with her name

The public television smash hit Downton Abbey is making waves again — though not because its killed off another character. It's because of one of the show's dogs. Specifically Isis. And you can probably figure out where this is going. Meanwhile, in Finland, the country's prime minister is blaming Apple for its economic problems. And France is blaming the English-speaking the world for being too politically correct. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Please note, you have not 'conquered' Everest — if you used a helicopter to do it

Expeditions to climb Mount Everest were put on hold this year, after an accident killed 16 Sherpas. But a Chinese woman reached the summit, and officials suspect she may have inappropriately used a helicopter. Meanwhile, in China, officials are using public trials to send a message to Uighur separatists, and Norway's touted prostitution reform is under attack. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Chile's earthquake could have been much worse

An offshore earthquake near Chile Tuesday night claimed six lives and caused millions of dollars of damage, but could have been much worse if Chile weren't so prepared. Meanwhile, in Turkey, it seems the country wasn't prepared for elections, with power outages reported. That and more in today's Global Scan.