Global Scan

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Global Scan

Vladimir Putin would like you to know he too opposes fracking

Imagine the foes of fracking and you'd probably put Greenpeace at the top of the list. But add Vladimir Putin too — someone who rarely sees eye-to-eye with the environmentalists. But he has his own reasons, not tied to saving the Earth. Meanwhile, there's tension over US military actions in Iraq. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Will the Pentagon's next war be 3-D printed?

Wars are often won or lost based more on logistics than on strategy. That's why the US military is looking into printing its supplies on the battlefield. Meanwhile, Britain has ended the evolution vs. creationism debate in its schools. Guess which won? And we tell about an Iranian soldier who could save Iraq. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the World Cup fueling underage prostitution in Brazil?

Big sporting events like the World Cup often increase prostitution. In Brazil, though, many of the sex workers are poor children. The World Cup is getting better press for the behavior of its Japanese fans, who stopped to pick up the trash at their stadium after the game. And we tell you about Game of Thrones, in real life, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the Russian bear awakening?

Rumors of possible Russian intervention abound as protests in the Ukraine escalate. And even the Pope's weekend prayer for peace in the country ended in an ominous sign. Working-class stiffs in the Republic of Congo show that style isn't exclusive to the rich. And a New Zealand doc doesn't let a shark attack ruin his day, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Wonder why stars like Gwyneth Paltrow and thousands of others are taking selfies without their makeup?

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Other times, thousands of pictures are worth £8 million. That's the case with the #nomakeupselfie campaign that has generated millions for Cancer Research UK. Meanwhile, in Ukraine, some are wondering how the navy could have been decimated in Crimea with little resistance. Plus, a St. Patrick's Day flashmob turns ugly.

Global Scan

Greenland's snow is getting darker, and that's bad for you and me

Greenland is home to a huge chunk of the Earth's frozen water. And every winter that ice is covered with snow, usually white snow that reflects sunlight back into space. But new information suggests that pollution and a warming climate are making that snow much darker — and consequently making it melt much faster. That story and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'The Hong Kong we are living in today is not the Hong Kong we knew'

The British handed Hong Kong to China 17 years ago today. And the anniversary meant many thousands of residents made their annual protest claiming the country has gone downhill ever since. Meanwhile, a lawmaker claims Pakistan is not convicting any rapists. And the US makes a step toward eliminating its land mines ... in 20 years. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A Russian billionaire offers to help save the dogs of Sochi

Sochi's dogs were recently described as pests, expected to be exterminated from the Olympic venues. But that cavalier attitude prompted international outrage and at least one Russian billionaire has opened up his wallet to help save some of Sochi's dogs. Meanwhile, in the UAE, the government is ready to launch a drone delivery service. And a homeless man in England looks set to return to his native Jamaica, thanks to the generosity of strangers.