Global Scan

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Global Scan

A zoo finally figures out why it failed to get two spotted hyenas to mate

One of the most important things zoos do is ensure the continued viability of a species. So a Japanese zoo took very seriously its efforts to get its pair of hyenas to mate. But it was foiled by nature. Both hyenas were male and that, surprisingly, wasn't obvious. Meanwhile in Dubai, the city police plan to outfit officers with pairs of Google glass to help them catch criminals. And in Syria, ISIS makes a big gain, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Want to host the 2022 Winter Olympics? We have just a few rules ...

The International Olympic Committee finds itself with two mediocre choices to host the 2022 Winter Olympics after Oslo, Norway, decided it wouldn't be hosting. Meanwhile, women in India and Colombia are standing up and saying no to violence. In India, a special all-female police squad has been created and in Colombia, a town is preparing for a one-night curfew on all men.

Global Scan

Should selfies be allowed on the pilgrimage to Mecca?

Muslims typically make the hajj just once in a lifetime — and it's a signature moment in their lives. So it's understandable that they would want to document the trip. But that has some religious leaders upset. Meanwhile in Russia, the government is mounting a full-court press to convince Western journalists that Russia is a good guy. Sadly, that campaign has not affected its treatment of LGBT individuals. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Now you can stare at cute, cuddly penguin photos — and help scientists, too

Scientists studying penguins in the Antarctic have set up automated cameras to document the lives of the sea birds. Unfortunately, all that footage has to be categorized — and that's where you come in. Meanwhile, the Iraqi Air Force is smarting after an embarrassing blunder of reinforcing ISIS militants. And in China, the police were taking no chances with a group of ceremonial pigeons. Those stories and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

India's low-budget Mars probe snaps an iconic photo of the red planet

India's Mars mission keeps grabbing headlines — including this week, when the probe took this remarkable photo. Meanwhile, the US is shipping more of its oil overseas than at any time in the past 50 years, and that's a good sign gas prices are heading down. And ISIS thwarts US airstrikes with a speedy change in its tactics, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The 'Hands up, don't shoot' gesture from Ferguson moves to Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, pro-democracy protests are being confronted by an unprecedented level of police force — and that's led them to adopt a gesture that would look familiar to anyone who saw photos of protests in Ferguson, Missouri, last month. Meanwhile, scientists think they have developed a new solar power collector that will be more affordable and efficient. And North Korea's Kim Jong-un takes ill — in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

These are the seven countries the US military has bombed in the last three years

US officials launched an air attack on ISIS rebels in Syria this week, making the war-torn Middle East country the seventh state — at least — to see US airstrike since 2011. Meanwhile, an African nation torn by Ebola is agreeing to halt logging in exchange for development aid. And in Iraq, the nation's Kurdish minority is looking at what it has achieved — with high hopes for its future.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

These are the seven countries the US military has bombed in the last three years

US officials launched an air attack on ISIS rebels in Syria this week, making the war-torn Middle East country the seventh state — at least — to see US airstrike since 2011. Meanwhile, an African nation torn by Ebola is agreeing to halt logging in exchange for development aid. And in Iraq, the nation's Kurdish minority is looking at what it has achieved — with high hopes for its future.

Global Scan

Remember WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange? If not, he's got a T-shirt for you

Julian Assange has been staying in the Ecuadorean embassy in London for months, largely out of the spotlight. But he's trying to put his face back in front of people — literally. On T-shirts. Meanwhile, we take your questions about Ebola and, in Canada, the dollar has fallen to a new five-year low, making Canadian goods inexpensive. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

What might have happened if Kennedy had lived?

The Cuban missile crisis had an epilogue that few know — the Kennedy administration was in secret talks with Cuba around a reconciliation. In current news, several women in London have been held in slavery for years, Europe contemplates its own NSA-proof cloud computing facility, and we visit Ford Nation — the Toronto mayor's fans who insist they'll vote for him again. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.