Global Scan

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Global Scan

That little bit of vandalism will cost you $25,000

If you've ever visited the Colosseum in Rome, you know how truly stunning it can be. One visitor, however, decided to commemorate his trip by leaving his mark on the historic structure. Local officials, however, didn't take kindly to that. That story and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to police, Russia gets the gold

Russia is proud of being out in front of other countries. But on one measure, it might not be quite so proud. It has more police per citizen than any other country tracked by the UN. Meanwhile, the Loch Ness monster is back in the news after 18 months without a peep. And a 100-year-old woman has a long-held dream come true and it gives her shivers. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Will a new strain of cacao tree save us from the coming chocolate shortage?

Chocoholics beware: What would you do if you couldn't buy chocolate — or if the price suddenly went through the roof? We may soon find out, unless science can save the day. Meanwhile, there's no looming shortage of human waste, and Britain is using it to fuel a passenger bus. Also, the Mafia's secret initiation rite is now on video for all to see. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A German town turns a neo-Nazi march into an anti-hate walkathon

A German town has spent decades grappling with a neo-Nazi group marching through it, honoring a Nazi hero. But this year, they came up with a way to make a little good come out of the march. Meanwhile, Norway is making its passports into works of art that reflect their country. And a video explanation of why the US and Liberia are linked by history. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Protesters attack a Dutch Santa Claus tradition as blatantly racist

In the Netherlands, a Christmas holiday tradition is leading to protests, clashes and arrests. Meanwhile, Turkey's president wants to build a mosque in Cuba — to honor the Muslim sailors he says arrived in North American 300 years before Columbus. And China discloses how it tried to clear Beijing's polluted skies before welcoming last week's APEC leaders. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'Magic' mushrooms to treat depression? Some researchers think so

Hallucinogenic mushrooms are one potential treatment for depression. Another is hip hop music — it seems the dark lyrics might reach those who feel equally hopeless. Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin comes to the rescue of China's first lady and his gallant act gets erased by Chinese censors. And in Pakistan, a group of schools hold an "I am not Malala" Day. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Should the matching shirt summit tradition live or die?

In 2011, US President Barack Obama spared world leaders the indignity of sporting Aloha shirts at a summit in Honolulu. But the matching shirt tradition is a hard one to kill. Meanwhile, millions of Catalans cast a symbolic vote for independence from Spain on Sunday. And a once-secret recording shows Ronald Reagan at his most charming in defusing a crisis. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

ISIS has a new hand sign — and it means far more than ‘We’re #1’

The Islamic militants known as ISIS have shown savvy in social media and in picking their symbols. We explore the deeper meaning behind their index finger salute — and their black-and-white flag. And an author shows a side of Iran's capital that you might not have expected, from sex to drugs to skinny jeans. And are you tired of being cramped in economy class? You're not alone. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.