Global Scan

PRI.org has a daily roundup and email newsletter that helps you find interesting perspectives on what's going on around the world. Sign up for a PRI.org account and subscribe to our newsletter to get it delivered to your inbox.

Global Scan

ISIS has a new hand sign — and it means far more than ‘We’re #1’

The Islamic militants known as ISIS have shown savvy in social media and in picking their symbols. We explore the deeper meaning behind their index finger salute — and their black-and-white flag. And an author shows a side of Iran's capital that you might not have expected, from sex to drugs to skinny jeans. And are you tired of being cramped in economy class? You're not alone. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Egypt's oldest pyramid is being destroyed by a repair effort

Egypt's ancient pyramids are a huge part of the country's history, culture and economy. That's why a government decision to give an important rehabilitation contract to a country with a bad track-record has invited so much scrutiny. The bad news is it seems critics fears are already coming true. Meanwhile, monkeys actually learn — and seem to want to learn — from watching video. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this the space vehicle that will be NASA's alternative to Russia's 'taxi service' to orbit?

As US-Russia relations deteriorate, NASA is picking up the pace on finding a way to get to the International Space Station without relying on Russian rockets. Three private companies could get the nod from NASA this week. Meanwhile, ISIS is emerging as a more dangerous global threat, with evidence that it is researching weapons of mass destruction and possibly targeting the pope. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is where bitcoins are made

Bitcoins are big money these days. So bitcoin miners are setting up vast, secretive warehouses filled with computers to earn them. We explain how it works. Meanwhile, terrorist wannabes have a lot to learn, so they turn to "The Koran for Dummies" for a quick education. And superstitions about albinism have taken a cruel turn in Tanzania, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

That monkey selfie? The US government says it belongs to all of us

This cute selfie taken by a monkey who happened on a photographer's camera does not belong to the photographer. So say US regulators, who explain their reasoning. Meanwhile, China's effort to stop the desert's advance using trees has hit a snag. And chalk up another marketing fail — a lingerie line with the same name as a terrorist group. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For the British, burning the White House 200 years ago is cause for a cake and sparklers

So just how did the British Embassy choose to celebrate its friendship with the US on Sunday? With a cake commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Brits burning down the White House during the War of 1812. It apologized on Monday. Meanwhile, the Ice Bucket Challenge, which has taken social media by storm, is getting its own challenge. And how much could an old comic book sell for? Try $3.2 million.

Global Scan

Five apps that can help you keep an eye on what your kids are doing

Are you a frustrated parent who can't get your kid to answer your phone and text messages? Never fear, the Ignore No More app is here ... along with a few other mobile tools for parents. And if you're a fan of Nutella, you just might want to stock up fast. Also, did you know the situation in Iraq has the US helping a group it labels as terrorists? That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the Russian bear awakening?

Rumors of possible Russian intervention abound as protests in the Ukraine escalate. And even the Pope's weekend prayer for peace in the country ended in an ominous sign. Working-class stiffs in the Republic of Congo show that style isn't exclusive to the rich. And a New Zealand doc doesn't let a shark attack ruin his day, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A Nobel Peace Prize for Edward Snowden?

A former Norwegian minister nominates Snowden for the Nobel Peace Prize. India's highest court maintains the country's ban on gay sex. And an Iranian teacher stands up for a stricken student who is bullied. All that and more, in today's Global Scan

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Rodman plays ball with North Korea's dictator

Basketball diplomacy, Dennis Rodman-style, keeps getting stranger. Scientists streak the South Pole and come away with frostbite in tender places. China overtakes Europe in R&D spending. And did you know that Hitchcock made a Holocaust documentary? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

McDonald's bows to Spain's schedule and serves breakfast until 1pm

McDonald's in Spain has been stumped by the Spanish culture of skipping breakfast in favor of a late dinner. So the company is trying something new with its menu. In the UK, a series of powerful storms have uncovered an ancient coastal forest. And if you are looking for a new vacation spot, you really should consider Siberia. That, plus more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This month, California will become the second state where Latinos are the largest ethnic group

Updated

California is a bellwether for the US and is about to become the second state with an Hispanic majority, joining New Mexico. But its politics will change more slowly. We look at a 20-cent ointment that can save an estimated half million babies. And in the UK, we see just how rich the very rich can be. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A new study identifies a promising technique to reverse male infertility. And it involves mice

Infertility in men can be an emotionally-difficult problem — and one that has been largely untreatable. But a new therapy being tested in mice is showing promising results. Plus, cell phone recordings tell of the final moments for South Korean teenagers caught in the ferry disaster. And a German exchange student is killed in America. All that and more in today's Global Scan.