Global Scan

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Global Scan

An 'uncontacted' tribe emerges from the Amazon — and into the dangers of modern life

Whatever drove them to it — perhaps encroachment on their land by illegal loggers or cocaine producers — an isolated Amazon tribe has made contact with the outside world, and that carries great risk for them. In the Middle East, Israelis and Palestinians talk of the risks they live daily from renewed conflict. And British intelligence conveniently loses some potentially incriminating documents, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'The Hong Kong we are living in today is not the Hong Kong we knew'

The British handed Hong Kong to China 17 years ago today. And the anniversary meant many thousands of residents made their annual protest claiming the country has gone downhill ever since. Meanwhile, a lawmaker claims Pakistan is not convicting any rapists. And the US makes a step toward eliminating its land mines ... in 20 years. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Spain may finally get to see a finished version of Gaudí's famous church — in Finland

Barcelona's famed Sagrada Familia church is still being built after more than a century. Now, impatient Finnish students plan to finish their own scaled-down version, imagined in this photo — out of ice. We also spotlight new relevations about Blackwater Security's lawless tactics during the Iraq War and wonder if Scotland's national dish is headed for the US, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Was the Taj Mahal built out of love ... or guilt?

The well-known story of the Taj Mahal is that a bereft emperor built it to honor his wife, who died in childbirth. But a new play in India suggests otherwise. In Brazil, some are analyzing the more prosaic plot lines that played out in Thursday's US-Germany World Cup match. And a young Jewish writer joins a gay pilgrimage to Israel, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

From Russia with smut: Inside the Soviet Union's porn collection

Russia allowed a rare glimpse inside its secret trove of porn, which Soviet officials snatched away from its citizens. Elsewhere, Ghana's government sent a planeload of cash to its World Cup heroes in Brazil to end a pay dispute. And PRI's The World answered all of your questions on the unfolding war in Iraq. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the Russian bear awakening?

Rumors of possible Russian intervention abound as protests in the Ukraine escalate. And even the Pope's weekend prayer for peace in the country ended in an ominous sign. Working-class stiffs in the Republic of Congo show that style isn't exclusive to the rich. And a New Zealand doc doesn't let a shark attack ruin his day, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

What's the next best thing to a roll in the mud with pigs?

Chinese pigs need a genetic upgrade, so Britain has graciously offered to help China at a $74 million per year price tag. China may not have bragged about its pigs, but an international test showed Chinese kids at the top of the class. But there's a catch. And Iceland grieves after the the police kill a man, for the first time in the country's history. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

A Russian billionaire offers to help save the dogs of Sochi

Sochi's dogs were recently described as pests, expected to be exterminated from the Olympic venues. But that cavalier attitude prompted international outrage and at least one Russian billionaire has opened up his wallet to help save some of Sochi's dogs. Meanwhile, in the UAE, the government is ready to launch a drone delivery service. And a homeless man in England looks set to return to his native Jamaica, thanks to the generosity of strangers.

Global Scan

Facebook plus drones equals Internet?

Facebook seems poised to bring Internet to the world, quite literally. The company is reported to be on the verge of buying a drone manufacturer to do just that. That, however, wasn't what led the pope to utter a rather coarse profanity in front of a large audience over the weekend. His F-bomb was actually just a mistake in pronunciation. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.