Global Scan

PRI.org has a daily roundup and email newsletter that helps you find interesting perspectives on what's going on around the world. Sign up for a PRI.org account and subscribe to our newsletter to get it delivered to your inbox.

Global Scan

Meet the US prison camp that helped give birth to ISIS

The US has long worried that its attempts to fight terrorism might actually spur more terrorism. We learn that a US detention camp in Iraq seems to have helped incubate ISIS. Meanwhile, it is Election Day in the US and an app lets Americans show their partisan choices as they shop. And an Egyptian bus driver found one heck of a way to fail a drug test. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Indians stage a protest for the right to kiss

In a scene right out of the US in the 1960s, thousands of Indians in Kerala province gathered for a "Kiss of Love" demonstration to protest moral policing by conservative groups in the country. Meanwhile, Japan outdoes the Scots when it comes to making single-malt Scotch. And Alzheimer's patients are finding luxurious care at a bargain price in Thailand. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This crash test dummy family is getting an overweight uncle — to reflect America's expanding waistlines

America's rise in obesity isn't just raising health alarms. It is challenging designers of all sorts of consumer products, including car safety experts, who are moving to a morbidly-obese crash test dummy. Meanwhile, in Russia, Apple's gay CEO is under attack. France and Spain, however, seem more worried about clowns. Those stories and more in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US government is spending millions to save a few dozen fish

In Death Valley, Nevada, there's a hole that is home to just a few dozen fish. But these aren't any fish — they were at the center of an environmental debate over endangered species that went to the Supreme Court some 40 years ago. Meanwhile, a British man gets a new bionic hand for less than $500. And Denmark is considering a ban on elective circumcision. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Irish women ride the rails to protest restrictions on abortion

Women in Ireland resurrect a protest tactic from four decades ago to fight the country's restrictive abortion laws. While in China, police crack down on an alleged "brothel" run out of a university hotel. It apparently gave discounts to those who had a student ID. And if you are a gravedigger, or anyone with a professional, or morbid, interest in the dead, there's a new dating site for you. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Consumerism knows no bounds when it comes to taste

With Halloween coming, there's a great deal of hand-wringing over potentially offensive and racist Halloween costumes. This "Sexy Ebola Nurse' outfit isn't racist, but it probably is offensive. Meanwhile, in China, the country considers dropping counterfeiting from the long list of crimes subject to the death penalty, and a burglar runs into his victim at the bank. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

From Russia with smut: Inside the Soviet Union's porn collection

Russia allowed a rare glimpse inside its secret trove of porn, which Soviet officials snatched away from its citizens. Elsewhere, Ghana's government sent a planeload of cash to its World Cup heroes in Brazil to end a pay dispute. And PRI's The World answered all of your questions on the unfolding war in Iraq. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A computer saves a Russian man from a bear attack

Encounters between hungry bears and people are increasingly common in Russia. But one encounter had an unexpected twist — and suggests a new use for that outdated computer. Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, the city's top leader says the city's poor can't be trusted with the right to vote. And Rwanda starts screening Americans for Ebola. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

India's low-budget Mars probe snaps an iconic photo of the red planet

India's Mars mission keeps grabbing headlines — including this week, when the probe took this remarkable photo. Meanwhile, the US is shipping more of its oil overseas than at any time in the past 50 years, and that's a good sign gas prices are heading down. And ISIS thwarts US airstrikes with a speedy change in its tactics, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

A US nursing association sides with a Navy nurse who refused to force-feed Gitmo prisoners

When a naval nurse decided that force-feeding prisoners on hunger strike in Guantanamo Bay was unethical, the potential career consequences were severe. Now fellow nurses are supporting the act of conscience. Meanwhile, a British couple gets fined for writing a critical hotel review on TripAdvisor. And Indian street vendors take on Walmart, in today's Global Scan.