Global Scan

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Global Scan

Remember WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange? If not, he's got a T-shirt for you

Julian Assange has been staying in the Ecuadorean embassy in London for months, largely out of the spotlight. But he's trying to put his face back in front of people — literally. On T-shirts. Meanwhile, we take your questions about Ebola and, in Canada, the dollar has fallen to a new five-year low, making Canadian goods inexpensive. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Italy's army enters the marijuana business

Italy recently allowed the chronically sick to purchase marijuana for medicinal purposes. But the country's supply has been severely constrained. Now the army is stepping in. Meanwhile, in Canada, the elk supply is anything but constrained and that's a problem. And President Barack Obama may have to ally with Syria's Bashar al-Assad.

Global Scan

Downton Abbey's pooch has a problem — with her name

The public television smash hit Downton Abbey is making waves again — though not because its killed off another character. It's because of one of the show's dogs. Specifically Isis. And you can probably figure out where this is going. Meanwhile, in Finland, the country's prime minister is blaming Apple for its economic problems. And France is blaming the English-speaking the world for being too politically correct. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Uganda says AIDS is on the rise because condoms are too small

Ugandan men are apparently loathe to use condoms because the international issue, one-size-fits-all version isn't big enough for them. And while that might seem like bragging or an excuse, Uganda is seeing AIDs infection rates, once tamed, on the rise again. Meanwhile, a court in New York is considering whether chimps should have some "human rights." And eating healthy really does cost more. All that, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A zoo finally figures out why it failed to get two spotted hyenas to mate

One of the most important things zoos do is ensure the continued viability of a species. So a Japanese zoo took very seriously its efforts to get its pair of hyenas to mate. But it was foiled by nature. Both hyenas were male and that, surprisingly, wasn't obvious. Meanwhile in Dubai, the city police plan to outfit officers with pairs of Google glass to help them catch criminals. And in Syria, ISIS makes a big gain, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Want to host the 2022 Winter Olympics? We have just a few rules ...

The International Olympic Committee finds itself with two mediocre choices to host the 2022 Winter Olympics after Oslo, Norway, decided it wouldn't be hosting. Meanwhile, women in India and Colombia are standing up and saying no to violence. In India, a special all-female police squad has been created and in Colombia, a town is preparing for a one-night curfew on all men.

Global Scan

Should selfies be allowed on the pilgrimage to Mecca?

Muslims typically make the hajj just once in a lifetime — and it's a signature moment in their lives. So it's understandable that they would want to document the trip. But that has some religious leaders upset. Meanwhile in Russia, the government is mounting a full-court press to convince Western journalists that Russia is a good guy. Sadly, that campaign has not affected its treatment of LGBT individuals. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the Russian bear awakening?

Rumors of possible Russian intervention abound as protests in the Ukraine escalate. And even the Pope's weekend prayer for peace in the country ended in an ominous sign. Working-class stiffs in the Republic of Congo show that style isn't exclusive to the rich. And a New Zealand doc doesn't let a shark attack ruin his day, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Even the New Year's baby can't escape the NSA

Public smoking is widespread in China, despite its official prohibition. So Chinese officials are turning up the pressure, telling Communist Party officials to stop — or else. Meanwhile, in France, a new law requires mobile-based ride hailing services like Uber to wait 15 minutes before picking up passengers. And this weekend's terrorists attacks in Russia are a problem.

Global Scan

New evidence suggests systematic torture by Syria's government

New images and reports have surfaced of wholesale torture and starvation on the part of the Syrian regime, just as peace talks to end the war are set to start on Wednesday. On the US west coast, scientists dispel fears that Pacific Ocean fish are contaminated with Fukushima radiation. And side-by-side men's toilets at an Olympic venue have become a social media joke. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A court says Americans should know the reason their government kills its citizens abroad

The Obama administration's effort to keep its memo on extra-judicial killings secret received a setback this week, when a judge ruled it had to hand over the rationale under the Freedom of Information Act. Meanwhile, North Koreans are increasingly frustrated with their own government — while Russians are falling more and more in line with theirs. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.