Global Scan

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Global Scan

Nicaraguans are told to eat lizards — because of a drought

Nicaragua is suffering under a terrible drought, which is reducing food stocks and raising food prices. That's made it increasingly difficult for Nicaraguans to have an adequate diet. So government officials are encouraging Nicaraguans to raise and eat lizards. Meanwhile, if you've seen a popup ad recently, the man behind them wants you to know he's sorry. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US says the crisis for Yazidis in Iraq is over — but the UN disagrees

Earlier this week, the US considered the possibility of sending American troops to rescue members of the Yazidi minority trapped by ISIS militants on Mount Sinjar in Iraq. Now, President Obama says the crisis has passed ... but others aren't so sure. And if you think women's rights are relatively new, guess again. And we explain why Ferguson, Missouri seems like a war zone, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Are alleged ISIS passports a hoax?

When militants declared an Islamic Caliphate in Iraq and Syria, social media buzzed with photos and claims they were printing 11,000 passports. But a closer look at those photos suggests they are fake. Meanwhile, US Marines land in Iraq to scope out a mission to rescue people trapped by ISIS, and South Africa has its own humanitarian rescue, but for rhinos, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Canada will send an experimental Ebola vaccine to Africa

The Ebola crisis in West Africa has challenged health workers and scientists, because there is no vaccine. But an experimental vaccine from Canada has been offered up to potentially help 1,000 people. But who gets it? Meanwhile, a French community south of Paris is sticking by an old and hateful name. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Groupon, step aside. Now, you can fly like a billionaire — on the cheap

The Internet makes all things possible, like finding and hiring a private jet that just happens to be going your way ... for a song. Meanwhile, Delhi police are urging citizens to use their smartphones to catch abusive police. And an "e-coyote" explains why he wants the clients he smuggles across the US-Mexico border to post on Facebook, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the Russian bear awakening?

Rumors of possible Russian intervention abound as protests in the Ukraine escalate. And even the Pope's weekend prayer for peace in the country ended in an ominous sign. Working-class stiffs in the Republic of Congo show that style isn't exclusive to the rich. And a New Zealand doc doesn't let a shark attack ruin his day, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Germany goes a bit greener — as in marijuana green

Germany opened the door to legal medical marijuana in 2008, but only a crack. Now, a German court has kicked the door a bit wider, by allowing some patients to grow their own pot. Meanwhile, Hamas is having trouble getting is old ally Hezbollah to help in its conflict with Israel. And most Brits say no to their government's new porn filter, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Chile's earthquake could have been much worse

An offshore earthquake near Chile Tuesday night claimed six lives and caused millions of dollars of damage, but could have been much worse if Chile weren't so prepared. Meanwhile, in Turkey, it seems the country wasn't prepared for elections, with power outages reported. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scandinavians, for the first time, are joining the jihad

Scandinavia is known for its commitment to civil and human rights, its government services and its equality. But it's also becoming a source of jihadi fighters in Syria. Pro-Russian militants in Ukraine have secured a huge cache of weapons. And a white man and his black puppet are creating candid talk on race in South Africa. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Dubai's traffic cops are getting Google Glasses

The Dubai police are hoping Google Glass will give them a leg up on traffic violators and criminals. In Turkey, though, a government official is being comforted after injuring his leg kicking a protester. And the CIA says it won't mix vaccine campaigns with its covert ops. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is the World Cup fueling underage prostitution in Brazil?

Big sporting events like the World Cup often increase prostitution. In Brazil, though, many of the sex workers are poor children. The World Cup is getting better press for the behavior of its Japanese fans, who stopped to pick up the trash at their stadium after the game. And we tell you about Game of Thrones, in real life, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An 'uncontacted' tribe emerges from the Amazon — and into the dangers of modern life

Whatever drove them to it — perhaps encroachment on their land by illegal loggers or cocaine producers — an isolated Amazon tribe has made contact with the outside world, and that carries great risk for them. In the Middle East, Israelis and Palestinians talk of the risks they live daily from renewed conflict. And British intelligence conveniently loses some potentially incriminating documents, in today's Global Scan.