Global Scan

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Global Scan

Here's a new way to track the tastes of the young and tech-savvy

Uber is a car service, hired through a mobile app, that is gaining popularity for those young and on the move. Now you can see exactly where they go. Meanwhile, in Russia, the young and tech-savvy founder of the country's leading social network is also on the move. He fled and says he was canned for failing to fall in line with the Kremlin. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A court says Americans should know the reason their government kills its citizens abroad

The Obama administration's effort to keep its memo on extra-judicial killings secret received a setback this week, when a judge ruled it had to hand over the rationale under the Freedom of Information Act. Meanwhile, North Koreans are increasingly frustrated with their own government — while Russians are falling more and more in line with theirs. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

How far will Putin go in Ukraine?

Russia's managed to sow discord across much of eastern Ukraine, without moving its military across the border. But why? Figuring that out will say a lot about how far the conflict goes. Meanwhile, attorneys at the military tribunals for accused terrorists in Guantanamo Bay say they are being spied on. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

When it comes to spying, everyone is in everyone else's business

The NSA ha ignited a firestorm over its extensive spying on friends and allies alike, but it's clear the US is far from alone. Also, a new study finds billions of planets in the Milky Way that might be like Earth, and a former US president says he almost punched out a foreign leader. All this and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Welcome to Sochi?

The winter Olympics in Sochi are just three weeks away, and things are starting to fall into place — including a host of new events. Plus a new beer made from whale meal in Iceland and a bet that cost two men an ear in Siberia in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Now who's throwing a fit about NSA eavesdropping? Add Germany to the list

Suspicions abound in this edition of the daily Global Scan. Newly-leaked documents show the NSA has spied on leaders and citizens of America's friends and foes alike. The Roma fall under suspicion of child trafficking, while they fear losing their legitimate children. And an Australian leader is suspicious over claims that fires raging in his country are an early sign of climate change. Those are some of the stories we're tracking in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

All the king's horses and all the king's men couldn't get Rob Ford out of office — again

Rob Ford is nothing if not a survivor. After being accused of patronizing prostitutes — a charge he denies — drinking and driving — a charge he admits to — and then making the sort of sexual comment that can't be repeated on a family-friendly website, he still hangs onto his job as mayor. Meanwhile, in Europe, it seems that in-flight phone calls may become OK. "Can you hear me now?" Ugh. Plus more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Britain's prime minister lays a 'welcome' mat for new EU citizens

David Cameron wants changes to EU immigration and movement laws, or else, but Germany says 'no way,' creating a stalemate. Meanwhile, the Chilean miners who spent two months trapped underground in 2010 continue to suffer from emotional problems. And a French comedian faces more trouble over allegations of racism and anti-semitism — in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Paris wants all of you lovers to stop putting locks on its bridges

Paris is the city of lovers, but maybe a little less today. Paris bridges have long been a spot people publicly declared their love — with a lock. But a new effort seeks to stop that trend. Meanwhile, an account from the New York Review of Books looks at the day in the 2000s when the NSA metadata gathering program nearly died. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Here's a new way to track the tastes of the young and tech-savvy

Uber is a car service, hired through a mobile app, that is gaining popularity for those young and on the move. Now you can see exactly where they go. Meanwhile, in Russia, the young and tech-savvy founder of the country's leading social network is also on the move. He fled and says he was canned for failing to fall in line with the Kremlin. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.