Global Scan

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Global Scan

How far will Putin go in Ukraine?

Russia's managed to sow discord across much of eastern Ukraine, without moving its military across the border. But why? Figuring that out will say a lot about how far the conflict goes. Meanwhile, attorneys at the military tribunals for accused terrorists in Guantanamo Bay say they are being spied on. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Should the US reconsider its support for African 'strongmen'

The United States has long made deals with foreign leaders out of expediency — and not shared values. But some of its allies in Africa are drawing increasing questions about what sort of governments the US is supporting. Meanwhile, British researchers are putting mummies through a CT scanner, and making surprising discoveries. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

iPhone won't stay charged? Blame Facebook

A German researcher and a former American Apple store employee both say iPhone battery problems are mainly caused by one app: Facebook. Meanwhile, Russians hear that the rest of the world's problems are all the fault of moral decay and political fascism outside the country. And in the developing world, a soccer ball was supposed to provide light for study, but is prone to break.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Ukraine waits in suspense, and China blocks embarrassing details of secret bank accounts

Ukraine's protesters suspend clashes to negotiate with President Viktor Yanukovich, while China's leadership scrambles to block the web and keep their secret offshore bank accounts from being revealed to Chinese citizens. Curling gets fancy at the Sochi Olympics and South Korea welcomes Canadian hockey players in its bid to qualify for the next Winter Olympics. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Iran and US agree, but on what exactly we're not sure

The news over the weekend was of an agreement between leaders of six world powers and Iran over that country's nuclear program — but what the agreement really says isn't really, well, agreed. Still, there was no shortage of strong feelings about the deal. Plus, a Canadian town has developed a system for dealing with polar bear visits to town. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

So just where will the NSA stop?

A judge rules against the NSA's widespread surveillance, while Edward Snowden applauds and offers to help Brazil block NSA eavesdropping on its citizens. Also, an international spat begins when the US arrests an Indian diplomat for underpaying her housekeeper. And the Boston Globe finds mental illness may have played a role in the Boston Marathon bombing. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Rodman plays ball with North Korea's dictator

Basketball diplomacy, Dennis Rodman-style, keeps getting stranger. Scientists streak the South Pole and come away with frostbite in tender places. China overtakes Europe in R&D spending. And did you know that Hitchcock made a Holocaust documentary? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

McDonald's bows to Spain's schedule and serves breakfast until 1pm

McDonald's in Spain has been stumped by the Spanish culture of skipping breakfast in favor of a late dinner. So the company is trying something new with its menu. In the UK, a series of powerful storms have uncovered an ancient coastal forest. And if you are looking for a new vacation spot, you really should consider Siberia. That, plus more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This month, California will become the second state where Latinos are the largest ethnic group

Updated

California is a bellwether for the US and is about to become the second state with an Hispanic majority, joining New Mexico. But its politics will change more slowly. We look at a 20-cent ointment that can save an estimated half million babies. And in the UK, we see just how rich the very rich can be. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Should the US reconsider its support for African 'strongmen'

The United States has long made deals with foreign leaders out of expediency — and not shared values. But some of its allies in Africa are drawing increasing questions about what sort of governments the US is supporting. Meanwhile, British researchers are putting mummies through a CT scanner, and making surprising discoveries. That and more in today's Global Scan.