Business, Finance & Economics

Business, Finance & Economics

Southeast Asia hopes a new common market will give it clout, but it may have a weak link in Thailand

Not so long ago, Thailand could boast about having one of the fastest growth rates in the world. But political turbulence, protests and a couple of coups have taken their toll. And there's anxiety about what will happen when the beloved king dies. How might the new Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Economic Community help Thailand get its act back together? What risks does Thailand's volatility have for a nascent regional grouping, with big aspirations to counterbalance China?

Business, Finance & Economics

A powerful Washington player takes on Walgreens to protect tiny Antarctic krill

The Antarctic krill, tiny shrimplike crustaceans, are a key part of the ocean’s food chain for whales, penguins and seals. Increasingly, krill have also become part of the human food chain — krill oil, with omega-3 fatty acids, is advertised as a wonder drug that may help combat heart health, high cholesterol and even improve our moods.

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Business, Finance & Economics

The new regulars at this French café are migrants living in a nearby camp

There are frequent protests in Calais, where the largest camp in France for migrants is located. But is was the appalling living conditions at Grande-Synthe, 30 miles away, that got the attention of Doctors Without Borders. Migrants there try to find the best ways to cope — for many men, that means becoming regulars in a local café. Some in the town even call it 'the Migrants' Café.'