Business, Finance & Economics

Business, Finance & Economics

Is this the workplace of the future?

Updated

A New York Times report over the weekend described a workplace culture at Amazon where long hours, regular culling of staff and back-stabbing are the norm. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos shot back, saying he doesn't recognize the company described by the Times and that he'd never work at a company with a workplace culture like that. Is the workplace model described by the Times really what's in store in the future?

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Business, Finance & Economics

Detroit's existing immigrant communities feel left out by a new proposal to attract skilled immigrants

Michigan Governor Rick Snyder is pushing immigration as one solution to Detroit's economic woes. He's asked the Obama Administration to designate 50,000 visas to attract skilled immigrants and entrepreneurs to the bankrupt city during the next five years. But Detroit's existing immigrant communities insist they be included in the economic strategy to bring Detroit back.

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Business, Finance & Economics

How Canada tried to eradicate poverty with guaranteed income

For some residents of the Netherlands it will soon be money for nothing. Utrecht in the Netherlands just announced it would be experimenting with "basic income." That is, giving people on welfare a paycheck regardless of whether they get a job or not. This isn't the first experiment in handing out checks without strings. Economist Evelyn Forget studied a similar experiment in Manitoba in the 1970s.

Business, Finance & Economics

Despite big efforts, the US is still a major consumer of illegal elephant ivory

Anti-poaching advocates have tried all manner of ways to get people to stop purchasing illegal animal products, from celebrity ads to staged, public destruction of ivory caches. In June 2015, the US government made a very public display of crushing a ton in front of thousands of onlookers in Times Square. Yet poachers are still finding a market for illegal ivory on American streets, thanks to the US’s confusing and hard-to-enforce poaching laws.