Business, Finance & Economics

Business, Finance & Economics

What the rise of the gig economy means for the American Dream

The future of work in America is likely to be more flexible, possibly more precarious, for many people, as the gig economy expands. Why is this happening, how can more people thrive in this transition, and what does it mean for America's place in the world in this century? Economic historian Louis Hyman of Cornell University, author of "Debtor Nation" and "Borrow: The American Way of Debt," weighs in.

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."

Business, Finance & Economics

The new regulars at this French café are migrants living in a nearby camp

There are frequent protests in Calais, where the largest camp in France for migrants is located. But is was the appalling living conditions at Grande-Synthe, 30 miles away, that got the attention of Doctors Without Borders. Migrants there try to find the best ways to cope — for many men, that means becoming regulars in a local café. Some in the town even call it 'the Migrants' Café.'

Business, Finance & Economics

In one of Africa's largest slums, these girls saved to solve a problem

Dozens of young people in the Kibera district of Nairobi have joined a savings club called Mashujaa, which means "heroes" in Swahili. Each member may only contribute a few pennies a day, but it adds up. And it allows the members to make big expenditures that might be out of reach. The deal is, they have to get the whole group's consent first.