South Asia

Conflict & Justice

'For less than a dollar, you can [buy] a liter of acid and basically destroy someone's life'

Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"

Conflict & Justice

'For less than a dollar, you can [buy] a liter of acid and basically destroy someone's life'

Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"

Arts, Culture & Media

A Pakistani cartoonist tries to keep up his craft in the face of rising restrictions

It's tough being a political cartoonist in Pakistan. In some schools of Islam, the artistic portrayal of people and animals is perceived as sacrilegious and Pakistan's extremist politics is spawning a new wave of restrictions on the production of visual arts. Sabir Nazar is a Pakistani cartoonist who is trying to reclaim the power of images and restore the role of cartoons as a way to convey messages across cultural and linguistic divides.