Enter the mind of Jonathan Goldstein. It's a nice place to visit, but you wouldn't want to live there. Part monologue and part telephone conversation, WireTap ushers you into the endearingly odd, funny universe of Jonathan's friends and family. The Montreal Gazette calls the show "something between borscht-belt comedy and Franz Kafka" and the Toronto Star describes it as "[pitting] the absurd against the plausible. The sense is of a world not completely unlike our own that runs parallel... conversation, storytelling and introspection, culled from equal parts real-world experience and the warp of Goldstein's imagination." WireTap was awarded the Gold World Medal for Best Regularly Scheduled Comedy Program at The New York Festivals in 2006. 

Listen to the Latest Edition

July 31, 2014

 
Why do awkward situations make us so uncomfortable? We speak with an expert on the subject for tips on how to deal with discomforting situations, and a story from writer Lydia Davis about navigating one of life's more awkward moments. Plus, Jonathan is thrown out of his comfort zone when Howard shows up in the studio with a CBC tour group to observe Jon's every more. Featuring Jason Mantzoukas and Samantha Scholfield. Lydia Davis' story 'Passing Wind' is from The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis, available from Farrar, Straus & Giroux in the U.S. This episode is not available for on-demand listening, but you can purchase it on iTunes.  Season 8, Episode 6 - EP - CBC Radio
Can anger be healthy? Why is God allowed to get angry but we're not? From anger management for children to unhelpful meditation exercises for adults, we bring you part two of our series on the 7 deadly sins: Wrath. [Original broadcast: Season 8] Featuring Starlee Kine, Joshua Karpati, professor Lawrence Cunningham and stories byRoss Murray and Ranee Zaporski. This episode is not available for on-demand listening, but you can purchase it on iTunes.  Season 8, Episode 6 - EP - CBC Radio

Latest Stories

Kurt Andersen

Kurt Andersen has been a columnist for "The New Yorker" and was editor-in-chief of both "New York" and "Spy" magazines, the latter of which he co-founded. Andersen began his career in journalism at "Time," where he was an award-winning writer on national affairs and criminal justice, and then for eight years the magazine's architecture and design critic.