Delve deep into the ever-changing cultural landscape with novelist and co-founder of legendary "Spy" magazine, Kurt Andersen. Studio 360 is public radio's smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy — so let Studio 360 give you new and different ideas for a movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Studio 360 also gives listeners a chance to get their creative juices flowing with regular listener challenges. Produced by PRI and WNYC Radio.

Latest episode from Studio 360

Peter Carey’s latest novel, "Amnesia," is about government surveillance, cyber terrorism, and the legacy of America’s bullying intelligence agencies. He was inspired to write it after turning down an offer to ghostwrite Julian Assange’s autobiography. We hear how lifting the embargo will affect...

Latest Stories

Arts, Culture & Media

How pop music helped save the whales

If you hear whale songs today, you might be getting a massage or a facial. Some recordings of humpback whales feature slow melodies — soothing enough for spa soundtracks. But not too long ago, in the early 1970s, the songs of whale songs ignited the passions of music listeners and animal activists, leading to a gold record for singer Judy Collins and a worldwide movement to save the whales.

Arts, Culture & Media

Benedict Cumberbatch takes on another brilliantly awkward role as the man who brought computers to the world

Alan Turing launched us on the road to computers when he was breaking codes for the Allies during World War II. He's considered the father of artificial intelligence and theoretical computer science. But his strange story was hidden for decades. Now, Benedict Cumberbatch takes on Turing in the new film, The Imitation Game.

Kurt Andersen

Kurt Andersen has been a columnist for "The New Yorker" and was editor-in-chief of both "New York" and "Spy" magazines, the latter of which he co-founded. Andersen began his career in journalism at "Time," where he was an award-winning writer on national affairs and criminal justice, and then for eight years the magazine's architecture and design critic.