The GroundTruth Project is a foundation-supported initiative dedicated to training the next generation of foreign correspondents in the digital age. It is focused on the issues of social justice including human rights, freedom of expression, emerging democracies, the environment, religious affairs and global health. 

Led by GlobalPost Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large Charles M. Sennott, GroundTruth seeks to foster dialogue and engagement about these issues, with the aim of finding solutions as well as exposing injustice. GroundTruth also seeks to build the capacity for freedom of expression in developing countries around the world by helping to train a new generation of correspondents who can work together across different media platforms and cultural backgrounds.

GroundTruth is currently developing fellowships, workshops and seminars led by Gary Knight, Co-Founder of the VII Photo Agency and director of Tufts University's Program for Narrative & Documentary Practice. This spirit of country-to-country, people-to-people partnership is at the core of GroundTruth.

Contact The GroundTruth Project at: thegroundtruthproject [at] gmail.com

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One hundred years after the First World War, boundaries established after the armistice at the "eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh hour" still shape many of today's conflicts. From ISIS's invasion of Mosul to Boko Haram's kidnapping of schoolgirls, GlobalPost co-founder Charles Sennott journeys from Iraq to Nigeria to the Balkans to Northern Ireland and the Holy Land to see how WWI's history lives on, the lessons learned — and far too often not learned.

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With opportunity scarce, Brazil's youth are demanding more than the World Cup

While Brazilian leaders are hoping the coming World Cup and Olympics will set the stage for the country’s coming-out party as an economic force to be reckoned with, young Brazilians tell a less promising tale. The youth unemployment rate is a formidable 15.6 percent. However, the larger problem for young people is actually underemployment. Working youth may be making a living, but they are not building careers.