America Abroad takes you on an hour-long audio journey deep inside an international news story. Each episode combines original field reporting, expert analysis, and historical pieces that incorporate archival audio and eyewitness accounts. Anchor Madeleine Brand delivers this unique mix of past and present to give listeners an update on what’s happening in the world and what it all means.

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Understanding Europe's Refugee Crisis: An International Town Hall

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November 03, 2015

Latest Stories

Lifestyle & Belief

Can two religions coexist in one space?

Southern Spain is home to one of the world’s most unique houses of worship, a cathedral built inside a mosque. The Mosque Cathedral of Cordoba has been a holy site for both Christians and Muslims for centuries and today it’s at the center of fierce debate over whether different religions can coexist in this shared sacred space.

Global Politics

Residents of 'Tehrangeles' disagree on the worth of the Iranian nuclear deal

Washington has been a focal point for discussions around the Iran Nuclear deal, but it’s not the only place the agreement is being debated. Around the country, people are making their opinions known — sometimes loudly, and sometimes more subtly — in coffee shops and at dinner tables. Nowhere is this debate more relevant than inLos Angeles’ Westwood neighborhood, also known as "Tehrangeles." It’s home to the largest Persian community outside of Iran.

Business, Finance & Economics

Despite big efforts, the US is still a major consumer of illegal elephant ivory

Anti-poaching advocates have tried all manner of ways to get people to stop purchasing illegal animal products, from celebrity ads to staged, public destruction of ivory caches. In June 2015, the US government made a very public display of crushing a ton in front of thousands of onlookers in Times Square. Yet poachers are still finding a market for illegal ivory on American streets, thanks to the US’s confusing and hard-to-enforce poaching laws.

Business, Finance & Economics

Anti-poaching efforts in Kenya focus on saving animals — and people too

In recent years, Kenya has been on the front line of the war against terror. In 2013, Al-Shabaab killed 67 people in an attack on Nairobi’s upscale Westgate mall. More recently, militants stormed a northern Kenyan university, killing 148 people in the country’s worst terrorist attack in more than a decade. Terrorism experts now know the group receives at least some of its funding from the illegal wildlife trade, so stopping poachers in Kenya’s national parks is not just about saving elephants, it’s about saving people, too.

Madeleine Brand

Madeleine Brand has had a long career in public media. Most recently, she was special correspondent for KCET's award-winning nightly news show SoCal Connected. Prior to that, she created and hosted her own daily public radio news show.