Daily Edition Archive

Each edition has that days stories listed with it.

PRI's The World: 7/03/14

July 03, 2014

Locals in southern California protest the arrival of migrants who've crossed the border from Mexico and are being bused to California for immigration processing. And, in Colombia towns have gone dry in an effort to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities associated with World Cup festivities. Plus, a native Spanish speaker tells us the challenges of doing play by play announcing in English.

PRI's The World: 7/02/14

July 02, 2014

International security through the eyes of millennials in the Middle East. A new book examines the hopes and frustrations of the youth activists of the so-called Arab Spring. Also on Wednesday, how microbes might help us feed the planet. And, a cookbook author tells us about the special flavor and uses of tamarind, a staple of Syrian Jewish cuisine still enjoyed in the diaspora.

PRI's The World: 7/01/14

July 01, 2014

Journalist Mark Hertsgaard has been parsing President Obama's big moves on climate policy recently, but he says it's a small statement the president made in a TV show this spring that could make the biggest difference. Plus, Nobel laureate Jody Williams joins us to discuss new progress on banning landmines around the world. And we meet a professional comedian who has just completed his term as Mayor of Reykjavik or as Lady Gaga calls him - the Mayor of Iceland.

PRI's The World: 6/30/14

June 30, 2014

Israel security forces say they've found the bodies of three teenagers who went missing two weeks ago in the West Bank. Plus the British government makes a fresh bid to get haggis, the Scottish dish made of sheep innards, into the US market. Would you eat haggis? And Washington DC's multi-national taxi drivers form an unlikely union.

PRI's The World: 6/27/14

June 27, 2014

The wars in Syria and Iraq are merging, and US policy in both countries is having to shift and adapt. Plus, forest clearing around the world is often done illegally in dense jungles far from the watchful eyes of authority. But regulators and environmentalists now have a new high-tech weapon at their disposal to fight deforestation. And, two Panamanian-American cousins in the Bay Area who rap about what it's like to be Afro-Latino immigrants.

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