Jonathan Guyer

Arts, Culture & Media

Two cartoonists in Egypt push the boundaries of what's acceptable and find a ready audience

You're barely 20, you're Egyptian and you're a political cartoonist. You hone your craft during the 2011 revolution and learn all the tricks around criticizing authority. After the revolution, you think everything is fair game. But then your editors start rejecting your cartoons and you wonder why your older colleagues seem all too willing to tow the line. What do you do? Like any good millennial, you head to social media, zines, and the parallel media universe online. Meet Anwar and Andeel, two of Egypt's most daring political cartoonists.

Global Politics

For Egypt's government, being funny is no laughing matter

A new Onion-like fake news outlet in Egypt publishes a fake news story about how Swedish police used laughing gas to disperse a women's-rights protest. Egypt's government and independent media reprint the story as if its real. An ad by an Egyptian mobile phone company features a puppet explaining how to use a sim card. A nationalist blogger charges that the ad is a coded message by the Muslim Brotherhood to incite violence. What's going on?

Global Politics

For Egypt's government, being funny is no laughing matter

A new Onion-like fake news outlet in Egypt publishes a fake news story about how Swedish police used laughing gas to disperse a women's-rights protest. Egypt's government and independent media reprint the story as if its real. An ad by an Egyptian mobile phone company features a puppet explaining how to use a sim card. A nationalist blogger charges that the ad is a coded message by the Muslim Brotherhood to incite violence. What's going on?

Arts, Culture & Media

Two cartoonists in Egypt push the boundaries of what's acceptable and find a ready audience

You're barely 20, you're Egyptian and you're a political cartoonist. You hone your craft during the 2011 revolution and learn all the tricks around criticizing authority. After the revolution, you think everything is fair game. But then your editors start rejecting your cartoons and you wonder why your older colleagues seem all too willing to tow the line. What do you do? Like any good millennial, you head to social media, zines, and the parallel media universe online. Meet Anwar and Andeel, two of Egypt's most daring political cartoonists.

Global Politics

For Egypt's government, being funny is no laughing matter

A new Onion-like fake news outlet in Egypt publishes a fake news story about how Swedish police used laughing gas to disperse a women's-rights protest. Egypt's government and independent media reprint the story as if its real. An ad by an Egyptian mobile phone company features a puppet explaining how to use a sim card. A nationalist blogger charges that the ad is a coded message by the Muslim Brotherhood to incite violence. What's going on?

Arts, Culture & Media

Two cartoonists in Egypt push the boundaries of what's acceptable and find a ready audience

You're barely 20, you're Egyptian and you're a political cartoonist. You hone your craft during the 2011 revolution and learn all the tricks around criticizing authority. After the revolution, you think everything is fair game. But then your editors start rejecting your cartoons and you wonder why your older colleagues seem all too willing to tow the line. What do you do? Like any good millennial, you head to social media, zines, and the parallel media universe online. Meet Anwar and Andeel, two of Egypt's most daring political cartoonists.