Carol Hills

Senior Producer, Reporter, and Global Cartoons Editor

Carol Hills was part of the original team that created and launched "PRI's The World" in 1996. Currently she is a producer and occasional reporter who proudly calls herself a generalist. Carol is interested in everything from US policy options in Afghanistan to the rise in pet ownership in the Middle East. She also has an interest in global humor (yes, sometimes it actually does translate) and produces a weekly narrated slideshow of political cartoons from around the globe. She is loquacious about language too and each month prattles on with colleague Patrick Cox in his podcast, "The World in Words."

Over the years, Carol has reported from Cuba, Nigeria, and Vietnam. She was a Knight Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology during 2001-2001 and has a masters degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Carol got her journalistic start in Boston on "The Ten O’Clock News" with Christopher Lydon.

Recent Stories

Health & Medicine

This catchy West African dance tune carries a public health message about Ebola

When you hear a catchy dance tune and find out it's called "Ebola's in Town," you might assume the song is about some cool person named Ebola. But no, it's about the deadly virus that's currently taking lives in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The song was recorded by three musicians from Liberia and the lyrics are about how to avoid contracting the Ebola virus but along the way it over-reaches and feeds into the stigma against the disease.

Conflict & Justice

US forces are helping Nigeria — but there are limits to what they'll do

Say you've got a friend and that friend is in trouble. You offer help but realize that behind the smiles and gratitude, your friend doesn't seem to know how to put it to use. And you, the helper, realize that you can't even fully utilize the help you've offered because your friend can't guarantee the minimum conditions necessary for you to deliver it.

Arts, Culture & Media

Two cartoonists in Egypt push the boundaries of what's acceptable and find a ready audience

You're barely 20, you're Egyptian and you're a political cartoonist. You hone your craft during the 2011 revolution and learn all the tricks around criticizing authority. After the revolution, you think everything is fair game. But then your editors start rejecting your cartoons and you wonder why your older colleagues seem all too willing to tow the line. What do you do? Like any good millennial, you head to social media, zines, and the parallel media universe online. Meet Anwar and Andeel, two of Egypt's most daring political cartoonists.