Audio Transcript:

LISA MULLINS: The war against the Taliban is sure to be a topic of conversation when President Obama visits Moscow next week, and Russia's president Dimitri Medvedev seems willing to talk about it. Medvedev recorded a video address about Obama's upcoming visit, in which he talked about common concerns such as terrorism and extremism. The video appeared first on the Kremlin website today. Reporter Jessica Golloher watched the video in Moscow and has this report.

JESSICA GOLLOHER: Wearing a sharp black suit with a red tie, Russian President Dimitri Medvedev spoke in front of his countryside resident. An informal setting, perhaps signaling that the meeting with Mr. Obama would be a get acquainted session. He clearly indicated Moscow is ready to reset relations with Washington.

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JESSICA GOLLOHER: Medvedev admitted relations have worsened over the past few years. He said there'd been a crisis of confidence, a lack of action, and unwillingness to take new steps despite good personal relations between George Bush and Medvedev's predecessor, Vladimir Putin. Medvedev admitted relations had declined to levels on par with the cold war era, but Medvedev had sensed a new spirit in the US.

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JESSICA GOLLOHER: He said the new Obama Administration is showing a willingness to change and build a more effective, reliable, and ultimately more modern relations. ?And,? said Medvedev, ?Russia was willing to do its part.? And Medvedev listed the common challenges in what he called the common responsibilities of both countries.

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JESSICA GOLLOHER: He talked about international security, and the fight against terrorism, extremism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and drug trafficking. On the world wide economic crisis, Medvedev was pretty frank.

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JESSICA GOLLOHER: He said it was hard to say which country is having a harder time getting through the difficulties. And went on to say, that now is not the time to say who is suffering more, or who is stronger. Medvedev called for uniting efforts to find solutions to the serious economic problems facing both countries. And Medvedev said both countries needed new mutually beneficial projects in business, science, and culture. And to show that he and Obama were part of a new dynamic generation, Medvedev ended by quoting another young American, President John Kennedy.

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JESSICA GOLLOHER: ?If we cannot end now our differences,? said Kennedy, ?at least we can help make the world safe for diversity.? Medvedev called Kennedy's words very wise, but it's a sign that Russia has no intention of totally following into line with the American Agenda. For The World, I'm Jessica Golloher in Moscow.