Stories from Carol Hills

Senior Producer, Reporter, and Global Cartoons Editor

Carol Hills was part of the original team that created and launched "PRI's The World" in 1996. Currently she is a producer and occasional reporter who proudly calls herself a generalist. Carol is interested in everything from US policy options in Afghanistan to the rise in pet ownership in the Middle East. She also has an interest in global humor (yes, sometimes it actually does translate) and produces a weekly narrated slideshow of political cartoons from around the globe. She is loquacious about language too and each month prattles on with colleague Patrick Cox in his podcast, "The World in Words."

Over the years, Carol has reported from Cuba, Nigeria, and Vietnam. She was a Knight Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology during 2001-2001 and has a masters degree from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Carol got her journalistic start in Boston on "The Ten O’Clock News" with Christopher Lydon.

Recent Stories

Arts, Culture & Media

Two cartoonists in Egypt push the boundaries of what's acceptable and find a ready audience

You're barely 20, you're Egyptian and you're a political cartoonist. You hone your craft during the 2011 revolution and learn all the tricks around criticizing authority. After the revolution, you think everything is fair game. But then your editors start rejecting your cartoons and you wonder why your older colleagues seem all too willing to tow the line. What do you do? Like any good millennial, you head to social media, zines, and the parallel media universe online. Meet Anwar and Andeel, two of Egypt's most daring political cartoonists.

Global Politics

Her contributions to South Africa were unknown, but a new film aims to change that

For 95 years the remains of Nokutela Mdima Dube lay ignored in a Johannesburg cemetery. Also ignored were her contributions to education, the creation of the African National Congress, and even a distinctive singing style later made famous by Miriam Makeba. Now a new documentary by an African scholar and filmmaker based in Minnesota restores Nokutela's place in the historical narrative of the New South Africa.

Arts, Culture & Media

Ralph Steadman's fear and loathing of Richard Nixon

Ralph Steadman's illustrations for the gonzo classic "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" are as famous as Hunter S. Thompson's prose. The British cartoonist found a favorite subject in Richard Nixon, a man he personally loathed but loved to draw. Steadman has gone on to draw successive American presidents, including Barack Obama, in his distinctive ink and spatter style and the release of a new film about him is an opportunity to look back at his impressions of American leaders.