Stories from Clark Boyd

Arts, Culture & Media

Here's a designer who makes objects, and people, uncomfortable

It's frustrating when something you think you know how to use suddenly becomes, well, almost - but not quite - utterly useless. And that's what Greek designer Katerina Kamprani has done with a set of 3-D computer renderings she calls "The Uncomfortable." Imagine a watering can with the spout turned backwards, or a fork with hinged tines. Yeah, it's enough to make you angry.

Sports

How the first NCAA tournament was played in the shadow of impending world war

Kentucky and UConn square off for the NCAA men's basketball championship Monday night. The game, and the circumstances, are a far cry from the first NCAA tournament, held in March of 1939. With the world on the brink of war, we take a look at how global events impacted the players of the eventual winners of the tournament, the Oregon Webfoots.

Arts, Culture & Media

Why artist Molly Crabapple decided to sketch Syria's dead

From the Occupy Wall Street movement to the economic crisis in Greece, artist Molly Crabapple has never shied away from politically charged stories. Now, she's lending her artistic talents to a project commemorating the more than 100,000 Syrians who have died during the past three years of conflict. The idea, she says, is to remember these people as individuals, not statistics.

Arts, Culture & Media

You wouldn't believe the situations a hard-working Lego photographer finds himself in

Everything is Awesome. That's the theme song to The Lego Movie, a recently released film that imagines a richly detailed life for its animated minifigure characters. But what's it like to be a working Lego stiff, a one-and-a-half-inch tall freelance Lego photographer? Andrew Whyte's been finding out. He's been carrying around a little Lego man for more than a year, photographing him every day, rain or shine.

Arts, Culture & Media

How the sands of time have almost swallowed a German ghost town in the Namibian desert

French photographer Romain Veillon has a thing for taking pictures of abandoned places. And you can't get much more abandoned than Kolmanskop, a German diamond mining town in Namibia that became a virtual ghost town in the early 1950s. Veillon visited Kolmanskop last summer, and returned to France with 4,500 photos of a place where time, but not sand, has stood still for decades.

Arts, Culture & Media

Here's why Irish author Roddy Doyle revisited his characters from The Commitments

Roddy Doyle made a splash in the mid-1980s with his first novel, The Commitments. He then took those characters on two more journeys with The Snapper and then The Van. Afterwards, he put them on a shelf for more than 20 years. But Ireland's recent economic crisis brought him back to the world of Jimmy Rabbitte's Dublin in a new novel called The Guts.

Sports

You, too, can join the 'Brazil Nuts' on their 1966-km walk to the World Cup

Adam Burns, Dave Bewick and Pete Johnston are hardcore English soccer fans. How hard core? They've decided to fly to Mendoza, Argentina and then walk more than 1,000 miles to Porto Alegre, Brazil. The idea isn't just to support England's soccer team, but also to raise awareness about the deadly drought that the region of Bahia is currently experiencing.

Pages