Stories from Nina Porzucki

Producer

When I was a kid my favorite record was a collection of sounds of the city: sirens, cooing pigeons, jack hammers, bicycle bells, dogs barking, horns honking, etc. I would play this record, much to the sheer agony of my parents, ad nauseum, making up a story for each sound. I like to think that was the first hint of a career in public radio. I joined The World's newsroom in 2013 after working as an independent producer/reporter. Prior to that I had a penchant for joining corps; first the Peace Corps in Romania and then traveling around the U.S. in an Airstream trailer as a facilitator for StoryCorps. When I'm not enlisting in yet another corps, you may find me baking pie, eating pie, and pretty much thinking about pie.

Recent Stories

Development & Education

Language is the great equalizer at this school in Louisiana

For decades, East Baton Rouge Parish school district was under a federal desegregation order. The school district continues to struggle with diversity in its schools. However, one result of the desegregation order was the introduction of a language immersion elementary magnet school program. Language was used in two ways: both to attract middle class white families to the inner-city school and to equalize the dynamics inside the classroom between rich and poor, black and white

Arts, Culture & Media

The cat's out of the bag on the footloose language of the high seas, matey

There is a long history of seafarer slang. Many expressions like "run the gauntlet" have passed into modern English. Scouse, a dialect spoken in the port city of Liverpool, is littered with old British English seafarer terms. But as the shipping industry has become increasingly global—the crew might be from the Philippines, the captain from Greece, the ship chartered in Barbados — what's happening to the lingo of the high seas?