Stories from Jeb Sharp

Special Correspondent

I write stories and make radio for PRI’s The World and WGBH. I got my start in the analog era, learning how to cut and splice audiotape in Bill Drummond’s radio class at the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley. I came to understand the power of the medium as a reporter and news director at Raven Radio, KCAW-FM, in Sitka, Alaska. I also worked briefly at WBUR-FM in Boston before finding my professional home here at The World. I am mostly a reporter but recently spent three and half years as “show producer,” supervising the newsroom and working with producers and editors to curate content for the daily broadcast. Before that I also hosted and produced The World’s first history podcast, “How We Got Here.” Each week I’d pick an item in the news and dig into the history behind it.

I have reported for the show from Belgium, Bosnia, Canada, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, France, Haiti, Gaza, Israel, Kosovo, the Netherlands, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, the UK and across the US. I’ve received some nice honors along the way: a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard, two Overseas Press Club awards for “History of Iraq” and “How Wars End,” a Dart Award for “Rape as a Weapon of War, ” and a Sigma Delta Chi award from the Society of Professional Journalists for “Rwanda: Trying to Move On.”  I spent a lot of my early years at The World reporting on U.S. foreign policy; these days I’m exploring global stories closer to home.


Recent Stories

Science, Tech & Environment

A Finnish landscape architect tries to connect the broken pieces of Boston's Emerald Necklace

Finnish landscape architect and visual artist Maria Jaakkola couldn't wait to get to Boston to see its famed Emerald Necklace, a system of interconnected city parks designed in the 19th century by the great Frederick Law Olmsted. But when she got there she was dismayed to see the state it was in. So she made a film to try and change things.

Business, Finance & Economics

How to bring high-speed trains to the US

Japan's high speed trains run upwards of 200 miles per hour while Amtrak's Acela can only go its top speed of 150 for short stretches. The reason? Outdated infrastructure. After World War II, the US invested in cars, not trains, and today its passenger railways lag far behind countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter lays out a new vision for US transportation in her book "Move: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead."