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Conflict & Justice

Will US cut number of operators on drone missions?


Last week USAF intelligence chief Lt. Gen. Robert Otto proposed reducing the number of operators needed to fly a drone mission, by having both the pilot and sensor operator duties rolled into a single job. An aviation reporter says it could save some money, but would not do much to address the morale of stressed drone operators.

Conflict & Justice

What does human trafficking look like today? How do we stop it?

I've traveled from New England to New York to Thailand to Vietnam to China’s southeast border to expose human trafficking routes and venues, and to bring attention to sex and labor exploitation. The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Tuesday took a closer look at this modern slave trade and its impact on public health worldwide, including in cities and rural communities across the USA.

Science, Tech & Environment

A way to save one of North America's fastest animals

For centuries, herds of pronghorn have traveled hundreds of miles across the west in the second longest land migration in North America. But today, pronghorn often encounter barbed wire fences on private and public land that delay or halt their journey. Now, scientists and wildlife managers are developing fencing systems that allow the pronghorn to cross safely.

Conflict & Justice

Yes, Paris could happen in the US

The attack in Paris on Friday has left many people asking, could it happen here? Former Assistant Secretary at the Department of Homeland Security, Juliette Kayyem, answers with a qualified "yes." But she also points out that US surveillance is currently more intensive than most European nations, making such an attack more difficult to pull off.

Science, Tech & Environment

At this trail-blazing cemetery, a flock of birders

Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge, Massachusetts is renowned as the final resting place for American luminaries, including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Fannie Farmer, and Charles Sumner. As America’s first garden cemetery, it’s also briefly home for migrating birds every spring and fall. A new book, "Dead in Good Company,” celebrates both the stories of the famous deceased and the wildlife that draws nature lovers to the cemetery.