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Global Scan

A computer saves a Russian man from a bear attack

Encounters between hungry bears and people are increasingly common in Russia. But one encounter had an unexpected twist — and suggests a new use for that outdated computer. Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, the city's top leader says the city's poor can't be trusted with the right to vote. And Rwanda starts screening Americans for Ebola. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

How a century-old rule is keeping the American legal profession from innovating like its foreign colleagues

If you want to get legal advice in Canada, you can swing by Wal-Mart. And in the UK, legal advice is handed out in grocery stores. But a rule implemented more than 100 years ago in the US keeps legal advice largely out of reach for most Americans and keeps innovations from changing the stodgy legal field.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Politics

Russians react to the Malaysia airplane tragedy with denials, conspiracy theories — and tears

As evidence mounts that a Russian anti-aircraft missile was used to shoot down Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, the government and ordinary Russians distrust the facts and deny that Russia had any responsibility. Moscow-based reporter Natalia Antonova shared the reactions she heard, including real sadness at the tragedy, with PRI's The World.