United States

Science, Tech & Environment

Environmental detectives are using DNA to track invasive species

In our increasingly globalized society, when people travel the tend to bring things home with them, whether they mean to or not: microbes, aquatic species, insects, plants. Many of these are harmless, but some wreak economic havoc, and, like the recent Ebola virus, lead to nationwide panic and fear. As in so many other realms, DNA analysis may provide some ways to better combat these problems.

Global Scan

ISIS thanks the Pentagon for its errant weapon airdrop

The Pentagon has been stepping up its efforts to reinforce Kurdish forces in Iraq and Syria as they battle ISIS terrorists. An airdrop in Kobane this week was meant to bolster them at a crucial time, unfortunately some of the supplies went off target. Plus a look at how humans came to eat dairy and a prohibition on kissing at a Zimbabwe university. Those stories in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

Nearly killed in Sierra Leone, this refugee has found more than a home in Worcester, Mass.

When Augustine Kanjia came to Worcester, Massachusetts, he'd been nearly killed by rebels, threatened by the Gambian government and forced to come to the US with little more than what he could carry. But what he found in the New England city was a warm welcome — that's made him truly believe Worcester is his forever home.