United Kingdom

Global Scan

Now you can have airline food without leaving the ground

Frequent fliers at least get points for suffering through airline cuisine. Soon Germans will get the option of having it delivered to their homes. And what does a business class meal cost on the ground? About $12. Newly-released files from Britain's National Archives confirm that the country's WWII spies had to pass a seduction test by "special agent" Fifi. And 50 South Koreans will experience an oxymoron — competitive relaxation. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

MIT researchers create a robo-cheetah that runs and jumps off-leash

It's not much of a looker when it comes to feline curves, but MIT's robotic cheetah sure can run. It is novel in both its motors and the math that calculates how hard it springs across uneven terrain. In Scotland, bankers are preparing for the worst — a run on banks if Scots vote "yes" to separate from Britain on Thursday. And we look at the sexy brewing device for coffee that was a favorite of James Bond and is coming back into fashion. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

Why vote for Scotland's independence? A Scottish teen explains his reasons

Sixteen-year-old James Kane from Oban, Scotland, was undecided until this week on whether to vote for independence for Scotland. He's not your usual teen. He interviewed leaders of many of Scotland's political parties before making up his mind. But he is typical in that teens from 16 on up will get to vote in this special referendum on the country's future.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Global Scan

What's the next best thing to a roll in the mud with pigs?

Chinese pigs need a genetic upgrade, so Britain has graciously offered to help China at a $74 million per year price tag. China may not have bragged about its pigs, but an international test showed Chinese kids at the top of the class. But there's a catch. And Iceland grieves after the the police kill a man, for the first time in the country's history. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

How corruption and factionalism in Nigeria spawned Boko Haram

Boko Haram's reign of terror in Nigeria continues to claim more lives, their methods becoming increasingly more violent, while the government seems to become increasingly inept, perhaps intentionally. In a lengthy investigative report, Newsweek examines the Islamist terrorist group, and the conditions that have allowed it to flourish.

Arts, Culture & Media

English might not have become quite so popular, if a 17th-century poet had his way

Back in the 17th century, there was a move to create rules for English, based on Latin. The man behind it, poet John Dryden, thought that Shakespeare and others had turned English into an unruly mess. Dryden failed to establish an English "academy" to impose rules. And that failure may have helped make English the worldwide language it is today.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.