United Kingdom

Arts, Culture & Media

English might not have become quite so popular, if a 17th-century poet had his way

Back in the 17th century, there was a move to create rules for English, based on Latin. The man behind it, poet John Dryden, thought that Shakespeare and others had turned English into an unruly mess. Dryden failed to establish an English "academy" to impose rules. And that failure may have helped make English the worldwide language it is today.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Global Scan

A Russian billionaire offers to help save the dogs of Sochi

Sochi's dogs were recently described as pests, expected to be exterminated from the Olympic venues. But that cavalier attitude prompted international outrage and at least one Russian billionaire has opened up his wallet to help save some of Sochi's dogs. Meanwhile, in the UAE, the government is ready to launch a drone delivery service. And a homeless man in England looks set to return to his native Jamaica, thanks to the generosity of strangers.

Global Scan

Wonder why stars like Gwyneth Paltrow and thousands of others are taking selfies without their makeup?

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Other times, thousands of pictures are worth £8 million. That's the case with the #nomakeupselfie campaign that has generated millions for Cancer Research UK. Meanwhile, in Ukraine, some are wondering how the navy could have been decimated in Crimea with little resistance. Plus, a St. Patrick's Day flashmob turns ugly.

Global Scan

How corruption and factionalism in Nigeria spawned Boko Haram

Boko Haram's reign of terror in Nigeria continues to claim more lives, their methods becoming increasingly more violent, while the government seems to become increasingly inept, perhaps intentionally. In a lengthy investigative report, Newsweek examines the Islamist terrorist group, and the conditions that have allowed it to flourish.