United Kingdom

Global Scan

Prince William's US trip seems more political than regal

When British royalty comes to the US, Americans go a little nuts. But this trip by Prince William has the Brits scratching their heads. Meanwhile, at least one British parliamentarian is looking to the US for ideas on how to deal with anti-abortion protesters. And the Chinese government is hunting for a corrupt Chinese official who was obsessed with gold.

Global Scan

Take a trip through London at night — with the lights off

Nights during a blackout in a big city offer a scary vision to some. But this new video shows how London's architecture would be set off by the night sky, if city lights weren't obscuring the view. Meanwhile, across the Channel, France has decided to pay foreign victims sent to Nazi camps in French trains. And China asks for US help to crack down on corrupt fugitives, in this weekend's Global Scan.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Global Scan

What's the next best thing to a roll in the mud with pigs?

Chinese pigs need a genetic upgrade, so Britain has graciously offered to help China at a $74 million per year price tag. China may not have bragged about its pigs, but an international test showed Chinese kids at the top of the class. But there's a catch. And Iceland grieves after the the police kill a man, for the first time in the country's history. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.