United Kingdom

Global Scan

Now you can have airline food without leaving the ground

Frequent fliers at least get points for suffering through airline cuisine. Soon Germans will get the option of having it delivered to their homes. And what does a business class meal cost on the ground? About $12. Newly-released files from Britain's National Archives confirm that the country's WWII spies had to pass a seduction test by "special agent" Fifi. And 50 South Koreans will experience an oxymoron — competitive relaxation. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

MIT researchers create a robo-cheetah that runs and jumps off-leash

It's not much of a looker when it comes to feline curves, but MIT's robotic cheetah sure can run. It is novel in both its motors and the math that calculates how hard it springs across uneven terrain. In Scotland, bankers are preparing for the worst — a run on banks if Scots vote "yes" to separate from Britain on Thursday. And we look at the sexy brewing device for coffee that was a favorite of James Bond and is coming back into fashion. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

Why vote for Scotland's independence? A Scottish teen explains his reasons

Sixteen-year-old James Kane from Oban, Scotland, was undecided until this week on whether to vote for independence for Scotland. He's not your usual teen. He interviewed leaders of many of Scotland's political parties before making up his mind. But he is typical in that teens from 16 on up will get to vote in this special referendum on the country's future.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Global Scan

This artist is taking snow angels to an extreme

Call it snowshoe art or perhaps folly in the freezing cold, but it takes imagination to create patterns that you can only see from a distance. And Alan Turing, the father of computer science, gets a posthumous pardon from Britain. Pakistan's long experiment in natural-gas cars is crashing. We also explore why Muslims and Jews are celebrating Christmas, and more, in today's Global Scan.