United Kingdom

Global Scan

This is how many times British cops fired guns all of last year: 3

Updated

As the debate over gun control — and, now, the use of force by police — rages in the US and elsewhere, Britain offers a stark contrast. Police there rarely carry guns, fire them or kill anyone. Meanwhile, Beijing is getting machines that inspire people to both recycle and ride public transit. And Ebola is killing Liberians who don't even have the disease, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Nicaraguans are told to eat lizards — because of a drought

Nicaragua is suffering under a terrible drought, which is reducing food stocks and raising food prices. That's made it increasingly difficult for Nicaraguans to have an adequate diet. So government officials are encouraging Nicaraguans to raise and eat lizards. Meanwhile, if you've seen a popup ad recently, the man behind them wants you to know he's sorry. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Canada will send an experimental Ebola vaccine to Africa

The Ebola crisis in West Africa has challenged health workers and scientists, because there is no vaccine. But an experimental vaccine from Canada has been offered up to potentially help 1,000 people. But who gets it? Meanwhile, a French community south of Paris is sticking by an old and hateful name. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Global Politics

It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.

Global Scan

New Zealanders will vote on whether to update their flag

A flag is usually a symbol of national pride. But not necessarily in New Zealand, where voters will get to decide whether to ditch the design that dates to colonial times. And for some reason a Cadillac ad that lauds America's work ethic and paints Europeans as slackers just rubs some Europeans the wrong way. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

A new video appears to show the kidnapped girls from Nigeria

A video released on Monday by the Islamist extremist group Boko Haram seems to shows some of the kidnapped girls for the first time. About a 100 of them appear on screen, wearing a full body veil, but with their faces visible. Also on the video, Boko Haram's leader says the girls will remain captive until the government releases some of the group's jailed fighters.

Global Scan

'The Hong Kong we are living in today is not the Hong Kong we knew'

The British handed Hong Kong to China 17 years ago today. And the anniversary meant many thousands of residents made their annual protest claiming the country has gone downhill ever since. Meanwhile, a lawmaker claims Pakistan is not convicting any rapists. And the US makes a step toward eliminating its land mines ... in 20 years. All that in today's Global Scan.