Uganda

Global Scan

Soon women in Saudi Arabia may be driving — as long as they don't wear makeup

Saudi Arabia has been criticized for years for refusing to allow women to drive in the kingdom. That ban may soon be lifted — though the change comes with some fine print. Meanwhile, leaked documents reveal how IKEA avoids paying corporate taxes. And the Miss Uganda competition takes an agricultural turn. Those stories and more, in today's Global Scan.

Development & Education

Are madrassas in Africa educating or indoctrinating?

One place that girls in Africa are finding an education is at Islamic religious schools known as madrassas. Typically these schools teach only boys, but in sub-Saharan Africa, more madrassas are being opened for girls and are usually funded by wealthy Arab donors. It’s a way to compensate for, what some say, is the extremely poor quality of state-funded schools.

Global Scan

Uganda says AIDS is on the rise because condoms are too small

Ugandan men are apparently loathe to use condoms because the international issue, one-size-fits-all version isn't big enough for them. And while that might seem like bragging or an excuse, Uganda is seeing AIDs infection rates, once tamed, on the rise again. Meanwhile, a court in New York is considering whether chimps should have some "human rights." And eating healthy really does cost more. All that, in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

Uganda's gay community is one step away from a new reality — being illegal

If you're a gay rights activist in Uganda, well, you're now illegal according to an anti-gay bill just passed by the country's parliament. The bill bans any sort of promotion or protection of gay rights. It also calls for life in prison for those convicted of "aggravated homosexuality" which is defined as gay sex with those infected by HIV, minors, and the disabled. But activists aren't throwing in the towel, they're girding for a fight.

Global Scan

Turkish protesters have a new target — their president's social media followers

Turkey's been embroiled in protests in recent months, with the country moving from crisis to crisis. The current crisis — over Internet freedom — has protesters targeting their president's Twitter followers. Meanwhile, in China, the government is saying no to low-quality recyclables. And Greece finally has a budget surplus — for the first time in almost 70 years. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.

Conflict & Justice

Ugandans react to Kato murder

Last week, prominent gay activist David Kato was killed in his home in Uganda. Many in the gay and lesbian community are frightened. But after the killing, a few are saying they won't hide anymore. Dennis Porter reports from Kampala.

Health & Medicine

Prioritizing Cancer

Richard Horton, editor of the medical journal The Lancet, criticizes governments and foundations for overlooking cancer as an important issue in the developing world. In an interview with reporter Joanne Silberner, Horton urges political leaders to take up the cause.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

Uganda says AIDS is on the rise because condoms are too small

Ugandan men are apparently loathe to use condoms because the international issue, one-size-fits-all version isn't big enough for them. And while that might seem like bragging or an excuse, Uganda is seeing AIDs infection rates, once tamed, on the rise again. Meanwhile, a court in New York is considering whether chimps should have some "human rights." And eating healthy really does cost more. All that, in today's Global Scan.