Uganda

Global Scan

Turkish protesters have a new target — their president's social media followers

Turkey's been embroiled in protests in recent months, with the country moving from crisis to crisis. The current crisis — over Internet freedom — has protesters targeting their president's Twitter followers. Meanwhile, in China, the government is saying no to low-quality recyclables. And Greece finally has a budget surplus — for the first time in almost 70 years. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A Nobel Peace Prize for legalizing marijuana — why not?

Uruguay made waves when it legalized the possession, consumption and manufacturing of marijuana. Now, the president has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. A 12-year-old discovers a new species of giant jellyfish. And just what would it take for New York City to host a winter Olympics? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Britain's prime minister lays a 'welcome' mat for new EU citizens

David Cameron wants changes to EU immigration and movement laws, or else, but Germany says 'no way,' creating a stalemate. Meanwhile, the Chilean miners who spent two months trapped underground in 2010 continue to suffer from emotional problems. And a French comedian faces more trouble over allegations of racism and anti-semitism — in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Politics

It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.

Politics

Uganda's gay community is one step away from a new reality — being illegal

If you're a gay rights activist in Uganda, well, you're now illegal according to an anti-gay bill just passed by the country's parliament. The bill bans any sort of promotion or protection of gay rights. It also calls for life in prison for those convicted of "aggravated homosexuality" which is defined as gay sex with those infected by HIV, minors, and the disabled. But activists aren't throwing in the towel, they're girding for a fight.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin offers an early Christmas present to a man once considered his biggest rival

Mikhail Khodorkovsky has spent a decade in a Russian prison colony, convicted of tax fraud and other malfeasance. But before he went to jail, he was the richest man in Russia — viewed as a legitimate challenger to Vladimir Putin. Some have speculated it was that threat, more than any misdeeds, that sent him to prison. But Friday, Putin pardoned Khodorkovsky and released him from prison. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Politics

Homophobia in Uganda

Lisa Mullins speaks with Ugandan gay rights activist Julius Kaggwa about the climate of homophobia in Uganda. Kaggwa is in the United States to accept a human rights award for his work opposing intolerance against gays.

Health & Medicine

Prioritizing Cancer

Richard Horton, editor of the medical journal The Lancet, criticizes governments and foundations for overlooking cancer as an important issue in the developing world. In an interview with reporter Joanne Silberner, Horton urges political leaders to take up the cause.

Politics

It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.

Politics

Circumcision and AIDS in Uganda

Recent studies suggest that male circumcision can provide some protection against HIV infection. Health officials in Uganda would like to promote male circumcision as part of a campaign to reduce HIV/AIDS. But Uganda's president doesn't support the idea