Uganda

Global Scan

Should the US reconsider its support for African 'strongmen'

The United States has long made deals with foreign leaders out of expediency — and not shared values. But some of its allies in Africa are drawing increasing questions about what sort of governments the US is supporting. Meanwhile, British researchers are putting mummies through a CT scanner, and making surprising discoveries. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Britain's prime minister lays a 'welcome' mat for new EU citizens

David Cameron wants changes to EU immigration and movement laws, or else, but Germany says 'no way,' creating a stalemate. Meanwhile, the Chilean miners who spent two months trapped underground in 2010 continue to suffer from emotional problems. And a French comedian faces more trouble over allegations of racism and anti-semitism — in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

Geo answer

The answer to today's Geo Quiz is the three "range" states of the endangered mountain gorilla -- Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Jamie Kemsey of the International Gorilla Conservation Program in Rwanda.

Development & Education

Are madrassas in Africa educating or indoctrinating?

One place that girls in Africa are finding an education is at Islamic religious schools known as madrassas. Typically these schools teach only boys, but in sub-Saharan Africa, more madrassas are being opened for girls and are usually funded by wealthy Arab donors. It’s a way to compensate for, what some say, is the extremely poor quality of state-funded schools.

Lord's Resistance Army fuels conflict

The World's Katy Clark reports on a recent wave of violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo by a notorious rebel group from neighbouring Uganda known as The Lord's Resistance Army, or LRA. The LRA is believed to have been behind a Christmas Day massacre there that left 400 civilians dead.

Global Scan

A Nobel Peace Prize for legalizing marijuana — why not?

Uruguay made waves when it legalized the possession, consumption and manufacturing of marijuana. Now, the president has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. A 12-year-old discovers a new species of giant jellyfish. And just what would it take for New York City to host a winter Olympics? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.