Uganda

Global Scan

Should the US reconsider its support for African 'strongmen'

The United States has long made deals with foreign leaders out of expediency — and not shared values. But some of its allies in Africa are drawing increasing questions about what sort of governments the US is supporting. Meanwhile, British researchers are putting mummies through a CT scanner, and making surprising discoveries. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Turkish protesters have a new target — their president's social media followers

Turkey's been embroiled in protests in recent months, with the country moving from crisis to crisis. The current crisis — over Internet freedom — has protesters targeting their president's Twitter followers. Meanwhile, in China, the government is saying no to low-quality recyclables. And Greece finally has a budget surplus — for the first time in almost 70 years. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

Corruption worsens an already devastating illegal wildlife trade in Uganda

Updated

Uganda sits in the center of Africa and is bordered by some of the continent’s most important game reserves. Its own animal population is relatively small, so it’s not a main target for poachers. But it is a major transit way for the illegal wildlife trade. The Ugandan government has tried to control the illegal trade crossing its borders, but it's been slow-going because a lot of the government is corrupt — including the country's wildlife agency.

Global Politics

A DDT debate in Uganda

In Uganda, a government program to battle malaria using DDT has provoked a fierce backlash. Some fear the government is poisoning them. Yet many public health experts say the risks of DDT are far less than the risks of malaria. On PRI's The World.

Global Scan

A Nobel Peace Prize for legalizing marijuana — why not?

Uruguay made waves when it legalized the possession, consumption and manufacturing of marijuana. Now, the president has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize. A 12-year-old discovers a new species of giant jellyfish. And just what would it take for New York City to host a winter Olympics? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.