Global Scan

Uganda says AIDS is on the rise because condoms are too small

Ugandan men are apparently loathe to use condoms because the international issue, one-size-fits-all version isn't big enough for them. And while that might seem like bragging or an excuse, Uganda is seeing AIDs infection rates, once tamed, on the rise again. Meanwhile, a court in New York is considering whether chimps should have some "human rights." And eating healthy really does cost more. All that, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Should the US reconsider its support for African 'strongmen'

The United States has long made deals with foreign leaders out of expediency — and not shared values. But some of its allies in Africa are drawing increasing questions about what sort of governments the US is supporting. Meanwhile, British researchers are putting mummies through a CT scanner, and making surprising discoveries. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Vladimir Putin offers an early Christmas present to a man once considered his biggest rival

Mikhail Khodorkovsky has spent a decade in a Russian prison colony, convicted of tax fraud and other malfeasance. But before he went to jail, he was the richest man in Russia — viewed as a legitimate challenger to Vladimir Putin. Some have speculated it was that threat, more than any misdeeds, that sent him to prison. But Friday, Putin pardoned Khodorkovsky and released him from prison. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo answer

An equatorial mountain range figures in today's Geo Quiz. The answer is the Rwenzori Mountains. The central African range is featured in "Africa: Atlas of our Changing Environment" a new atlas published by UNEP, the United Nations Environmental Program. The glaciers that give these stunning mountains their snowcapped appearance are disappearing due to global climate change.


Homophobia in Uganda

Lisa Mullins speaks with Ugandan gay rights activist Julius Kaggwa about the climate of homophobia in Uganda. Kaggwa is in the United States to accept a human rights award for his work opposing intolerance against gays.

Health & Medicine

Prioritizing Cancer

Richard Horton, editor of the medical journal The Lancet, criticizes governments and foundations for overlooking cancer as an important issue in the developing world. In an interview with reporter Joanne Silberner, Horton urges political leaders to take up the cause.


It just got even tougher to be gay in Nigeria

Technically, it's been illegal to be gay in Nigeria since the country's independence from Britain in 1960. But the wording was vague and the law was hard to enforce. Now a new law just signed by Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan creates an effective dragnet with the ability to arrest any Nigerian who is gay or who supports or advocates on any issues related to homosexuality.