South Korea

Global Scan

When NASA's newest spaceship takes off Thursday, it'll be back to the future

Ever since NASA mothballed the Space Shuttle, it hasn't flown a spaceship. That will change on Thursday morning, when it test-launches the Orion space capsule, which is designed for possible Mars travel . Meanwhile, South Korea intends to rankle North Korea with another large Christmas tree in the DMZ. And a new ranking of government corruption gives the US middling marks.

Global Scan

ISIS thanks the Pentagon for its errant weapon airdrop

The Pentagon has been stepping up its efforts to reinforce Kurdish forces in Iraq and Syria as they battle ISIS terrorists. An airdrop in Kobane this week was meant to bolster them at a crucial time, unfortunately some of the supplies went off target. Plus a look at how humans came to eat dairy and a prohibition on kissing at a Zimbabwe university. Those stories in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

A zoo finally figures out why it failed to get two spotted hyenas to mate

One of the most important things zoos do is ensure the continued viability of a species. So a Japanese zoo took very seriously its efforts to get its pair of hyenas to mate. But it was foiled by nature. Both hyenas were male and that, surprisingly, wasn't obvious. Meanwhile in Dubai, the city police plan to outfit officers with pairs of Google glass to help them catch criminals. And in Syria, ISIS makes a big gain, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Antarctica is sending the equivalent of 9.8 quadrillion ice cubes into the oceans each year

The melting of the Antarctic ice sheet is happening far faster than anyone previously thought. New research suggests Antarctica is releasing enough ice each year to make 9.8 quadrillion one-inch ice cubs — and that's contributing to a major increase in sea levels. Meanwhile, the violence in Nigeria is getting worse and French Catholic leaders are looking for donors. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

Koreas trade artillery fire

North and South Korea exchanged artillery fire today in one of the most dramatic confrontations between the two since the Korean War ended without a peace treaty. Reporter Jason Strother has reaction from South Korea.