South Africa

Global Scan

At these Paris hotels, it's up to you how much you pay

Priceline offers to let you name your own price for your hotel, but it's not quite literal. A group of Paris hotels are letting you stay at their hotel and pay as much as you want when you check out. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, and protests are mounting around the world. Plus autocorrect — it's much more complex than you might think. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Sports

How can the US advance in the World Cup?

The fate of the US national soccer team is still up in the air. After a heartbreaking draw against Portugal on Sunday, everything now rides on their final game against Germany on Thursday. Reporter and soccer player Anders Kelto explains what needs to happen for the US to make it to the next round of the World Cup.

Arts, Culture & Media

What's it like to portray Nelson Mandela in an opera? Amazing!

If you're in Pretoria, South Africa, one show you won't be able to see is a new opera about Nelson Mandela. That's because the show, "Madiba: The African Opera," was cancelled after just three nights because of a lack of funding. The opera depicts Nelson Mandela's early years in his native home of Qunu, on South Africa's Eastern Cape. Thabang Senekal is the well-known South African baritone who played Mandela in the production. He describes what it's like to play Mandela on stage.

Global Politics

Her contributions to South Africa were unknown, but a new film aims to change that

For 95 years the remains of Nokutela Mdima Dube lay ignored in a Johannesburg cemetery. Also ignored were her contributions to education, the creation of the African National Congress, and even a distinctive singing style later made famous by Miriam Makeba. Now a new documentary by an African scholar and filmmaker based in Minnesota restores Nokutela's place in the historical narrative of the New South Africa.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'

Updated

Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'

Updated

Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Global Scan

The interpreter scandal at Mandela's memorial takes a bizarre turn

We are learning more about the fake interpreter for the deaf who signed gibberish during Mandela's memorial service. He may well have posed a security risk. We highlight an Ethiopian village that has found a path out of poverty, only to be resented by its neighbors. And Greenpeace activists are learning that being "free" on bail in Russia has its limits, in today's Global Scan.

Sports

How can the US advance in the World Cup?

The fate of the US national soccer team is still up in the air. After a heartbreaking draw against Portugal on Sunday, everything now rides on their final game against Germany on Thursday. Reporter and soccer player Anders Kelto explains what needs to happen for the US to make it to the next round of the World Cup.