South Africa

Global Scan

Are alleged ISIS passports a hoax?

When militants declared an Islamic Caliphate in Iraq and Syria, social media buzzed with photos and claims they were printing 11,000 passports. But a closer look at those photos suggests they are fake. Meanwhile, US Marines land in Iraq to scope out a mission to rescue people trapped by ISIS, and South Africa has its own humanitarian rescue, but for rhinos, in today's Global Scan.

How new technologies are bringing water to the developing world

The introduction of better water management and water technology can change lives in places like Sub Saharan Africa. And it’s not just Sub Saharan Africa where water is a problem. The United Nations estimates that three-quarters of a billion people lack access to clean water and that almost two-point-five billion lack access to adequate sanitation. One solution to the problem may be through innovation and technology. Here's a look at three that are trying to make a difference.

Global Scan

At these Paris hotels, it's up to you how much you pay

Priceline offers to let you name your own price for your hotel, but it's not quite literal. A group of Paris hotels are letting you stay at their hotel and pay as much as you want when you check out. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to mount in Gaza, and protests are mounting around the world. Plus autocorrect — it's much more complex than you might think. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Sports

How can the US advance in the World Cup?

The fate of the US national soccer team is still up in the air. After a heartbreaking draw against Portugal on Sunday, everything now rides on their final game against Germany on Thursday. Reporter and soccer player Anders Kelto explains what needs to happen for the US to make it to the next round of the World Cup.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'

Updated

Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Global Scan

Mandela brings people together, even in death

World leaders and regular people gathered Tuesday in South Africa to honor Nelson Mandela — a man who was labelled a terrorist by the US until 8 years ago, a friend of China and Cuba, and now a symbol of hope and reconciliation for millions. We also look at Saudi Arabia's interest in its own human genome project, one of the most extreme zipline rides in the world, and a video game where the villian is alcoholism. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.