Scotland

Global Scan

This is how many times British cops fired guns all of last year: 3

Updated

As the debate over gun control — and, now, the use of force by police — rages in the US and elsewhere, Britain offers a stark contrast. Police there rarely carry guns, fire them or kill anyone. Meanwhile, Beijing is getting machines that inspire people to both recycle and ride public transit. And Ebola is killing Liberians who don't even have the disease, in today's Global Scan.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Sports

In a Scotland village, skipping rocks is more than just a hobby. It’s a tourist attraction

The picturesque village of Ermatingen in northern Switzerland has acquired a reputation for being a boring holiday resort. So the locals decided to liven things up a bit by holding a "world stone skimming championship." Only problem was, an island in Scotland already holds an annual competition by that name, and it has a limitless supply of skimming stones.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Global Scan

Woody Allen is in the spotlight again over old accusations

New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof brought new media attention to Woody Allen's past over the weekend, when Kristof published a letter from Allen's adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow, restating her claim that Allen had molested her. In Russia, Jamaica's bobsled team arrives in Sochi without their equipment. And a UN committee denounces the Vatican's handling of child sex abuse, all in today's Global Scan.

Arts, Culture & Media

Geo answer

The answer to our Geo Quiz today is Ross Island, Antarctica, where some whiskey bottles have been buried in ice for over a century. Richard Paterson at Whyte & Mackay's distillery tells Marco Werman about the quest to salvage some of that vintage scotch.

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

How high the moon?

December 21 marks the shortest day � and the longest night of the year in the northern hemisphere. This year there was an extra treat on the solstice: A total lunar eclipse. Our question today: Do you know the distance to the moon?

Global Scan

For $89 million, this old London Tube station could have been yours

If you've ever wanted to own a London Tube station, you may have just missed your opportunity. The UK Ministry of Defense recently sold a station its held since World War II — for a whopping $89 million. A few hundred miles to the north of that station, in Scotland, the country's politicians have decided to open their doors to Uganda's gay people who may be seeking asylum. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Sports

In a Scotland village, skipping rocks is more than just a hobby. It’s a tourist attraction

The picturesque village of Ermatingen in northern Switzerland has acquired a reputation for being a boring holiday resort. So the locals decided to liven things up a bit by holding a "world stone skimming championship." Only problem was, an island in Scotland already holds an annual competition by that name, and it has a limitless supply of skimming stones.

Global Scan

This is how many times British cops fired guns all of last year: 3

Updated

As the debate over gun control — and, now, the use of force by police — rages in the US and elsewhere, Britain offers a stark contrast. Police there rarely carry guns, fire them or kill anyone. Meanwhile, Beijing is getting machines that inspire people to both recycle and ride public transit. And Ebola is killing Liberians who don't even have the disease, in today's Global Scan.