Russia

Global Scan

A computer saves a Russian man from a bear attack

Encounters between hungry bears and people are increasingly common in Russia. But one encounter had an unexpected twist — and suggests a new use for that outdated computer. Meanwhile, in Hong Kong, the city's top leader says the city's poor can't be trusted with the right to vote. And Rwanda starts screening Americans for Ebola. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Forget the apple. Saudi Arabia is offering its best teachers a Bimmer

Saudi Arabia has a plan to reward its best teachers with thousands of dollars and luxury cars. Student rewards come next. Elsewhere, a Russian monastery hopes to solve the country's mozzarella shortage. And a three-year-old movie gives you a an accurate sense of what it is like fighting the Ebola outbreak. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Should selfies be allowed on the pilgrimage to Mecca?

Muslims typically make the hajj just once in a lifetime — and it's a signature moment in their lives. So it's understandable that they would want to document the trip. But that has some religious leaders upset. Meanwhile in Russia, the government is mounting a full-court press to convince Western journalists that Russia is a good guy. Sadly, that campaign has not affected its treatment of LGBT individuals. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this the space vehicle that will be NASA's alternative to Russia's 'taxi service' to orbit?

As US-Russia relations deteriorate, NASA is picking up the pace on finding a way to get to the International Space Station without relying on Russian rockets. Three private companies could get the nod from NASA this week. Meanwhile, ISIS is emerging as a more dangerous global threat, with evidence that it is researching weapons of mass destruction and possibly targeting the pope. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

Russians react to the Malaysia airplane tragedy with denials, conspiracy theories — and tears

As evidence mounts that a Russian anti-aircraft missile was used to shoot down Malaysia Airlines flight MH17, the government and ordinary Russians distrust the facts and deny that Russia had any responsibility. Moscow-based reporter Natalia Antonova shared the reactions she heard, including real sadness at the tragedy, with PRI's The World.

Global Hit - Complaints Choirs

The World's Patrick Cox update us on a cultural phenomenon that began in Europe but has now gone global. People from Finland to Singapore are getting together to form "Complaints Choirs."

Global Politics

Russia-Georgia conflict

The leaders of the European Union say they will postpone renewing an important economic and political agreement with Russia because of its actions in Georgia. The World's Gerry Hadden says concern about a cut off of Russian oil and gas affected the EU.

Global Politics

Russia feels the pinch

The global financial crisis has hit Russia's oil and gas industries, the backbone of the economy, and ordinary Russians are starting to feel the pain. The World's Laura Lynch reports from Moscow.