Pakistan

Global Scan

'Magic' mushrooms to treat depression? Some researchers think so

Hallucinogenic mushrooms are one potential treatment for depression. Another is hip hop music — it seems the dark lyrics might reach those who feel equally hopeless. Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin comes to the rescue of China's first lady and his gallant act gets erased by Chinese censors. And in Pakistan, a group of schools hold an "I am not Malala" Day. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This crash test dummy family is getting an overweight uncle — to reflect America's expanding waistlines

America's rise in obesity isn't just raising health alarms. It is challenging designers of all sorts of consumer products, including car safety experts, who are moving to a morbidly-obese crash test dummy. Meanwhile, in Russia, Apple's gay CEO is under attack. France and Spain, however, seem more worried about clowns. Those stories and more in this weekend's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

'For less than a dollar, you can [buy] a liter of acid and basically destroy someone's life'

Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"

Global Scan

Consumerism knows no bounds when it comes to taste

With Halloween coming, there's a great deal of hand-wringing over potentially offensive and racist Halloween costumes. This "Sexy Ebola Nurse' outfit isn't racist, but it probably is offensive. Meanwhile, in China, the country considers dropping counterfeiting from the long list of crimes subject to the death penalty, and a burglar runs into his victim at the bank. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

'For less than a dollar, you can [buy] a liter of acid and basically destroy someone's life'

Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"

Global Scan

'The Hong Kong we are living in today is not the Hong Kong we knew'

The British handed Hong Kong to China 17 years ago today. And the anniversary meant many thousands of residents made their annual protest claiming the country has gone downhill ever since. Meanwhile, a lawmaker claims Pakistan is not convicting any rapists. And the US makes a step toward eliminating its land mines ... in 20 years. All that in today's Global Scan.

Water scarcity heightens tensions between India and Pakistan

In 2013, the Asian Development Bank declared Pakistan as one of the most “water-stressed” countries in the world. One of the hardest hit areas is the Sindh province, in the northernmost region of Pakistan. It shares a border with India. This land is mostly desert so migration in search of water is a way of life. Those who live here say that India is making their life harder and could be a source of conflict between the two countries.

Global Scan

Dubai's traffic cops are getting Google Glasses

The Dubai police are hoping Google Glass will give them a leg up on traffic violators and criminals. In Turkey, though, a government official is being comforted after injuring his leg kicking a protester. And the CIA says it won't mix vaccine campaigns with its covert ops. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.