Mexico

Global Scan

For the British, burning the White House 200 years ago is cause for a cake and sparklers

So just how did the British Embassy choose to celebrate its friendship with the US on Sunday? With a cake commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Brits burning down the White House during the War of 1812. It apologized on Monday. Meanwhile, the Ice Bucket Challenge, which has taken social media by storm, is getting its own challenge. And how much could an old comic book sell for? Try $3.2 million.

Global Scan

An ancient lost Mayan city reappears in Mexico

The Mayan civilization thrived more than a thousand years ago. Many of its cities simply disappeared as jungle overtook them. One of them was found decades ago and then lost again, until now. We also report on why women may be bearing the brunt of Ebola's attack in West Africa, and how Syrian cyber-warriors are using viral clickbait to trap enemies of the Syrian regime. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Nicaraguans are told to eat lizards — because of a drought

Nicaragua is suffering under a terrible drought, which is reducing food stocks and raising food prices. That's made it increasingly difficult for Nicaraguans to have an adequate diet. So government officials are encouraging Nicaraguans to raise and eat lizards. Meanwhile, if you've seen a popup ad recently, the man behind them wants you to know he's sorry. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US says the crisis for Yazidis in Iraq is over — but the UN disagrees

Earlier this week, the US considered the possibility of sending American troops to rescue members of the Yazidi minority trapped by ISIS militants on Mount Sinjar in Iraq. Now, President Obama says the crisis has passed ... but others aren't so sure. And if you think women's rights are relatively new, guess again. And we explain why Ferguson, Missouri seems like a war zone, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

Texas volunteers help Central American migrants during their first hours of freedom on US soil

Some migrant families with young children detained shortly after arriving from Central America are sent to live with relatives in the US as they await their date in court. That transition — suddenly being released — can be frightening and overwhelming. But there is one effort in McAllen, Texas, to help these migrants during their first few minutes on US soil.

Conflict & Justice

Here's an explanation about why there's a backlog of immigration cases

US immigration courts face major bottlenecks. It's a complex problem, tied to a shortage of judges, underfunding and different enforcement programs in the US used to deter migrants from crossing the US-Mexico border. And on top of all that, data shows that people from Central America and Mexico are less likely to get asylum than others.

Global Scan

Groupon, step aside. Now, you can fly like a billionaire — on the cheap

The Internet makes all things possible, like finding and hiring a private jet that just happens to be going your way ... for a song. Meanwhile, Delhi police are urging citizens to use their smartphones to catch abusive police. And an "e-coyote" explains why he wants the clients he smuggles across the US-Mexico border to post on Facebook, all in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Arts, Culture & Media

If you like enchiladas con mole, give thanks to Mexico’s convent kitchens

Barbara Sibley is the chef and owner of La Palapa Cocina Mexicana in New York, but she was born and raised in Mexico. Her parents were expatriate Americans who fell in love with Mexico and decided to stay. At college, Sibley studied anthropology. And maybe that's why she's so interested in the roots of modern Mexican cuisine, and especially the role played by Mexican convents in creating that cuisine.

Conflict & Justice

Mexican journalists lose a 'formidable advocate' with death of Mike O'Connor

Mike O'Connor grew up on the US-Mexican border. After spending a career as a reporter in numerous conflict zones, O'Connor joined the Committee to Protect Journalists in 2009 and moved to Mexico City to work as advocate for press freedom. O'Connor died of a heart attack this week. Host Marco Werman speaks with the CPJ's Carlos Lauria about O'Connor's legacy.