Liberia

Global Scan

Prince William's US trip seems more political than regal

When British royalty comes to the US, Americans go a little nuts. But this trip by Prince William has the Brits scratching their heads. Meanwhile, at least one British parliamentarian is looking to the US for ideas on how to deal with anti-abortion protesters. And the Chinese government is hunting for a corrupt Chinese official who was obsessed with gold.

Global Scan

A German town turns a neo-Nazi march into an anti-hate walkathon

A German town has spent decades grappling with a neo-Nazi group marching through it, honoring a Nazi hero. But this year, they came up with a way to make a little good come out of the march. Meanwhile, Norway is making its passports into works of art that reflect their country. And a video explanation of why the US and Liberia are linked by history. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is how many times British cops fired guns all of last year: 3

Updated

As the debate over gun control — and, now, the use of force by police — rages in the US and elsewhere, Britain offers a stark contrast. Police there rarely carry guns, fire them or kill anyone. Meanwhile, Beijing is getting machines that inspire people to both recycle and ride public transit. And Ebola is killing Liberians who don't even have the disease, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An ancient lost Mayan city reappears in Mexico

The Mayan civilization thrived more than a thousand years ago. Many of its cities simply disappeared as jungle overtook them. One of them was found decades ago and then lost again, until now. We also report on why women may be bearing the brunt of Ebola's attack in West Africa, and how Syrian cyber-warriors are using viral clickbait to trap enemies of the Syrian regime. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Health & Medicine

This catchy West African dance tune carries a public health message about Ebola

When you hear a catchy dance tune and find out it's called "Ebola's in Town," you might assume the song is about some cool person named Ebola. But no, it's about the deadly virus that's currently taking lives in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The song was recorded by three musicians from Liberia and the lyrics are about how to avoid contracting the Ebola virus but along the way it over-reaches and feeds into the stigma against the disease.