Jordan

Conflict & Justice

At a refugee hospital in Jordan, kids deal with war, resilience and friendship

In a town in Syria, two young boys were exploring outside when they found an electronic device. That device turned out to be an explosive, and they were badly wounded. Fortunately, they were quickly brought to a hospital in neighboring Jordan. But despite their dire circumstances, the two managed to persevere — while their friendship grew stronger than ever.

Conflict & Justice

Why Jordan is at the epicenter of nearly all Middle Eastern issues

The rise of ISIS is connected to Jordan. The Israeli-Palestinian crisis plays out in the shadow of Jordan. The Syrian civil war and it's ensuing refugee crisis are taking a heavy toll on Jordan. Even the Iranian nuclear talks has a connection to Jordan. So, why Jordan, a landlocked country with few natural resources but tremendous importance for American foreign policy, at the middle of it all.

Development & Education

Turkey faces a daunting challenge in trying to educate hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees

Inside Syria, almost six million children have been affected by the country's ongoing civil war, and millions more have fled the country to find safety in refugee camps. Turkey, for example, has opened its doors to about a million-and-a-half Syrian refugees since spring 2011. But as the war drags on, Turkey is finding itself with a long-term humanitarian and education problem.

Global Scan

If you want to climb Everest, you're going to have to help clean it up

if you've ever thought about climbing Mount Everest, you better pack an extra trash bag. A new rule requires all climbers to bring down eight kilograms of garbage over and above their own trash. Odds are they won't be bringing down banana peals, at least if you believe new research that bananas could be under threat. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Arts, Culture & Media

Revealing a lie of forbidden love

Anchor Katy Clark speaks with the director of a documentary about con-artist Norma Khouri. Khouri became an international sensation in 2003 for her debut novel, "Forbidden Love." It was billed as the true-life story of the honor-killing of Khouri's best friend in Jordan. Turns out, Khouri made up the story. Critics say her con damaged efforts to reform laws to protect women in Jordan, and exposes Westerners' willingness to believe the worst of the Middle East.

Conflict & Justice

At a refugee hospital in Jordan, kids deal with war, resilience and friendship

In a town in Syria, two young boys were exploring outside when they found an electronic device. That device turned out to be an explosive, and they were badly wounded. Fortunately, they were quickly brought to a hospital in neighboring Jordan. But despite their dire circumstances, the two managed to persevere — while their friendship grew stronger than ever.

Conflict & Justice

Why Jordan is at the epicenter of nearly all Middle Eastern issues

The rise of ISIS is connected to Jordan. The Israeli-Palestinian crisis plays out in the shadow of Jordan. The Syrian civil war and it's ensuing refugee crisis are taking a heavy toll on Jordan. Even the Iranian nuclear talks has a connection to Jordan. So, why Jordan, a landlocked country with few natural resources but tremendous importance for American foreign policy, at the middle of it all.

Conflict & Justice

At a refugee hospital in Jordan, kids deal with war, resilience and friendship

In a town in Syria, two young boys were exploring outside when they found an electronic device. That device turned out to be an explosive, and they were badly wounded. Fortunately, they were quickly brought to a hospital in neighboring Jordan. But despite their dire circumstances, the two managed to persevere — while their friendship grew stronger than ever.

Conflict & Justice

Why Jordan is reaching its limits with Syrian refugees

King Abdullah of Jordan has told the BBC that his country has reached saturation point in its ability to take in and care for Syrian refugees. Speaking ahead of an international donors conference in London on Thursday, King Abdullah said Jordan could not continue to accept refugees unless it received more support, including help to create more jobs for Jordanians. The country has accepted hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees; together with unregistered migrants and Syrians there before the conflict, they make up 20 percent of the population.