Japan

Global Scan

Soon women in Saudi Arabia may be driving — as long as they don't wear makeup

Saudi Arabia has been criticized for years for refusing to allow women to drive in the kingdom. That ban may soon be lifted — though the change comes with some fine print. Meanwhile, leaked documents reveal how IKEA avoids paying corporate taxes. And the Miss Uganda competition takes an agricultural turn. Those stories and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Meet the US prison camp that helped give birth to ISIS

The US has long worried that its attempts to fight terrorism might actually spur more terrorism. We learn that a US detention camp in Iraq seems to have helped incubate ISIS. Meanwhile, it is Election Day in the US and an app lets Americans show their partisan choices as they shop. And an Egyptian bus driver found one heck of a way to fail a drug test. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Indians stage a protest for the right to kiss

In a scene right out of the US in the 1960s, thousands of Indians in Kerala province gathered for a "Kiss of Love" demonstration to protest moral policing by conservative groups in the country. Meanwhile, Japan outdoes the Scots when it comes to making single-malt Scotch. And Alzheimer's patients are finding luxurious care at a bargain price in Thailand. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Consumerism knows no bounds when it comes to taste

With Halloween coming, there's a great deal of hand-wringing over potentially offensive and racist Halloween costumes. This "Sexy Ebola Nurse' outfit isn't racist, but it probably is offensive. Meanwhile, in China, the country considers dropping counterfeiting from the long list of crimes subject to the death penalty, and a burglar runs into his victim at the bank. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

Japan vows to continue its whaling program, despite an international ruling ordering it to stop

In the 19th and 20th centuries, the global whale population was hunted to near extinction. A moratorium on commercial whaling, proposed in 1982 and enforced beginning in 1986 aimed to reverse this, and it has been successful: some whale species are beginning to recover, albeit slowly. Japan, however, has continued killing whales, in the name of "research" — and after agreeing to abide by an international ruling ordering it stop, it is now planning to resume whaling in 2015.

Sports

Geo answer

Anchor Lisa Mullins finds out more about a 16-year-old girl who's about to become Japan's first female professional baseball player. She was drafted by a team from Kobe -- which is the answer to our quiz today.

Arts, Culture & Media

''A Drifting Life''

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Adrian Tomine about Japanese cartoonist Yoshihiro Tatsumi's new autobiographical graphic novel, "A Drifting Life." Tomine edited the English language edition of the book.

Arts, Culture & Media

Japanese Jazz Opera

The standard view of Japanese popular culture,in the US, is that it's impossible to fathom. There's a video doing the rounds online that has peasants singing American jazz standards. The World's Alex Gallafent finds out what it all means.

Science, Tech & Environment

Anxiety in Tokyo

The World's Mary Kay Magistad reports on the anxiety felt by Tokyo residents about possible radiation exposure from Japan's earthquake and tsunami damaged nuclear reactors. Many city residents are skeptical of official statements.