Japan

Global Scan

Greeks wonder who was buried in this huge tomb 2300 years ago

It is the largest ancient burial site in Greece and, just a month after its announcement, it has brought new life to two small villages 60 miles east of Thessaloniki. But who was important enough to be buried there? Meanwhile in India, when some families are planning a wedding, the first to-do is to hire a marriage detective. And Russian President Putin decides to intervene in a children's show, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An ancient lost Mayan city reappears in Mexico

The Mayan civilization thrived more than a thousand years ago. Many of its cities simply disappeared as jungle overtook them. One of them was found decades ago and then lost again, until now. We also report on why women may be bearing the brunt of Ebola's attack in West Africa, and how Syrian cyber-warriors are using viral clickbait to trap enemies of the Syrian regime. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Just what is this ball the Curiosity rover found on the surface of Mars

NASA's Mars missions may not have been as cheap as the recent Indian mission, but their rovers and orbiters continue to provide stunning discoveries. Earlier this month, one of the rovers sent back a photo that seemed decidedly out of place: a round sphere, like a 16th century cannonball. Meanwhile, in India, women are being celebrated for their central mission in that country's Mars mission. And one man tries to smuggle 51 turtles into Canada, by taping them to his body.

Global Scan

New clashes in Kiev, reviewing the guest list for Syria's peace talks, and Russian fears of 'black widows'

The situation in Kiev remains volatile, with protesters in favor of closer ties with the European Union burning buses and hurling projectiles at police. And planned Syria peace talks in Geneva this week were nearly derailed by a UN invitation to include Iran. And Russia is looking for four women it is worried may be planning suicide attacks at the Sochi Olympics. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

Japan vows to continue its whaling program, despite an international ruling ordering it to stop

In the 19th and 20th centuries, the global whale population was hunted to near extinction. A moratorium on commercial whaling, proposed in 1982 and enforced beginning in 1986 aimed to reverse this, and it has been successful: some whale species are beginning to recover, albeit slowly. Japan, however, has continued killing whales, in the name of "research" — and after agreeing to abide by an international ruling ordering it stop, it is now planning to resume whaling in 2015.

Global Politics

China and Japan play ball

China and Japan don't always display good sportsmanship when their respective sports teams play each other, but Chinese fans were remarkably well-behaved today as their Olympic baseball team was trounced by Japan. The World's Mary Kay Magistad reports.

Global Politics

U.S.-Japanese relations

A new poll by Japanese newspaper Yomiuri suggests that the level of Japanese dissatisfaction with the United States is at its lowest since 2000. Anchor Lisa Mullins finds out why from Leo Lewis, Tokyo correspondent for the Times of London.

Arts, Culture & Media

Marriage-hunting in Japan

In Japan, many singles are taking no chances when it comes to getting married. They're going to "marriage hunting" events, a mix between speed dating and a job interview. Even the government is getting involved. Akiko Fujita reports from Tokyo.