Iraq

Global Scan

Now you can stare at cute, cuddly penguin photos — and help scientists, too

Scientists studying penguins in the Antarctic have set up automated cameras to document the lives of the sea birds. Unfortunately, all that footage has to be categorized — and that's where you come in. Meanwhile, the Iraqi Air Force is smarting after an embarrassing blunder of reinforcing ISIS militants. And in China, the police were taking no chances with a group of ceremonial pigeons. Those stories and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

In dealing with ISIS, Obama could take cues from the Camp David Accords

The nature of war is that it’s impossible to predict its outcome, and the current military campaign against ISIS is no exception. But some conflicts can have peaceful conclusions — like the Camp David Accords that ended the Israel-Egypt conflict. Author Lawrence Wright argues that we can turn to the diplomacy of Jimmy Carter to learn how to deal with ISIS.

Global Scan

India's low-budget Mars probe snaps an iconic photo of the red planet

India's Mars mission keeps grabbing headlines — including this week, when the probe took this remarkable photo. Meanwhile, the US is shipping more of its oil overseas than at any time in the past 50 years, and that's a good sign gas prices are heading down. And ISIS thwarts US airstrikes with a speedy change in its tactics, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

These are the seven countries the US military has bombed in the last three years

US officials launched an air attack on ISIS rebels in Syria this week, making the war-torn Middle East country the seventh state — at least — to see US airstrike since 2011. Meanwhile, an African nation torn by Ebola is agreeing to halt logging in exchange for development aid. And in Iraq, the nation's Kurdish minority is looking at what it has achieved — with high hopes for its future.

Global Scan

Dennis Rodman brings his brand of basketball diplomacy back to North Korea

Dennis Rodman's controversial relationship with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un turned another page this week. The former NBA star was in North Korea this week to select and train a North Korean basketball team that will take part in an exhibition game in honor of Kim's birthday. Plus Egyptian activists are thrown in jail and elves — yes, elves — halt a highway project in Iceland, in today's Global Scan.

Turkish troops enter northern Iraq

Turkey has launched a cross-border military operation into Northern Iraq and Turkish military officials say they'll the continue until they eliminate the threat from Kurdish separatist rebels

U.S. joins Iraqi assault on militias

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with the BBC's Crispin Thorold in Baghdad, about the on-going battle against Shiite militias in Iraq; Iraqi government forces have led the assault, but U.S. forces have now supported the Iraqis with air strikes.

Basra fighting

Host Lisa Mullins gets the latest on fighting in the Sadr City area in Baghdad from the BBC's Clive Myrie, as Shiite militias took advantage of a sandstorm that hit the capital yesterday to step-up their attacks.

Global Politics

Obama's stance on Iraq

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama has built his political message on Iraq around a theme: bringing American troops home, but the Illinois senator has begun to moderate his position

Global Politics

Syria protests against U.S.

Syria says eight civilians were killed when U.S. forces stationed in Iraq attacked a target inside Syria. The U.S. won't confirm or deny the raid. Anchor Katy Clark speaks with The World's Quil Lawrence in Baghdad.

Global Politics

Iraq's political landscape changes

Preliminary results from last weekend's provincial elections in Iraq are rolling in. And they may signal a change in Iraq's political landscape. Anchor Marco Werman finds out who's in and who's out from the BBC's Jim Muir in Baghdad.