Indonesia

Global Scan

The conflict over Ukraine now reaches into space

Russia has announced it will stop selling rocket engines to the US, as the tit-for-tit sanctions over Ukraine increase. That will hurt America's ability to loft satellites into orbit and support the International Space Station. Elsewhere, Nigerian vigilante groups form to fight against Boko Haram and a religious ritual in Indonesia involves anonymous sex, in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

Geo answer

For our Geo Quiz today, we're looking for the largest -- and northernmost -- island in the Indonesian archipelago. The answer is Sumatra. Anna Sussman reports that the rush for environmentally-friendly fuel is having a devastating impact on the island's endangered orangutans.

Global Politics

Indonesia death toll rises

At least 1,100 people have died in the earthquake that struck the Indonesian island of Sumatra on Wednesday, UN humanitarian chief John Holmes has said. Marco Werman gets the latest from Amelia Merrick with the aid group World Vision.

Global Politics

Rabies outbreak in Bali

The US goverment has issued travel advisories for Americans visiting Bali in recent months. The concern is an outbreak of rabies. Now one woman has been working with local authorities to help control the problem. The World's Alex Gallafent has the story.

Global Scan

Forget the apple. Saudi Arabia is offering its best teachers a Bimmer

Saudi Arabia has a plan to reward its best teachers with thousands of dollars and luxury cars. Student rewards come next. Elsewhere, a Russian monastery hopes to solve the country's mozzarella shortage. And a three-year-old movie gives you a an accurate sense of what it is like fighting the Ebola outbreak. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Will a new strain of cacao tree save us from the coming chocolate shortage?

Chocoholics beware: What would you do if you couldn't buy chocolate — or if the price suddenly went through the roof? We may soon find out, unless science can save the day. Meanwhile, there's no looming shortage of human waste, and Britain is using it to fuel a passenger bus. Also, the Mafia's secret initiation rite is now on video for all to see. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

How new technologies are bringing water to the developing world

The introduction of better water management and water technology can change lives in places like Sub Saharan Africa. And it’s not just Sub Saharan Africa where water is a problem. The United Nations estimates that three-quarters of a billion people lack access to clean water and that almost two-point-five billion lack access to adequate sanitation. One solution to the problem may be through innovation and technology. Here's a look at three that are trying to make a difference.