India

Global Scan

For the British, burning the White House 200 years ago is cause for a cake and sparklers

So just how did the British Embassy choose to celebrate its friendship with the US on Sunday? With a cake commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Brits burning down the White House during the War of 1812. It apologized on Monday. Meanwhile, the Ice Bucket Challenge, which has taken social media by storm, is getting its own challenge. And how much could an old comic book sell for? Try $3.2 million.

Global Scan

Groupon, step aside. Now, you can fly like a billionaire — on the cheap

The Internet makes all things possible, like finding and hiring a private jet that just happens to be going your way ... for a song. Meanwhile, Delhi police are urging citizens to use their smartphones to catch abusive police. And an "e-coyote" explains why he wants the clients he smuggles across the US-Mexico border to post on Facebook, all in today's Global Scan.

How new technologies are bringing water to the developing world

The introduction of better water management and water technology can change lives in places like Sub Saharan Africa. And it’s not just Sub Saharan Africa where water is a problem. The United Nations estimates that three-quarters of a billion people lack access to clean water and that almost two-point-five billion lack access to adequate sanitation. One solution to the problem may be through innovation and technology. Here's a look at three that are trying to make a difference.

Water scarcity heightens tensions between India and Pakistan

In 2013, the Asian Development Bank declared Pakistan as one of the most “water-stressed” countries in the world. One of the hardest hit areas is the Sindh province, in the northernmost region of Pakistan. It shares a border with India. This land is mostly desert so migration in search of water is a way of life. Those who live here say that India is making their life harder and could be a source of conflict between the two countries.

Hinglish: A Case of Reverse Colonization?

English is something of an open-source language: the people who speak it shape it, and add to it. No one has the authority to exclude words. That affects how English is spoken by its hundreds of millions of native speakers; also, how it's spoken by those who come to it as a second or third language. Those speakers are having a profound influence on English. Especially in country as large as India.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Global Scan

He became famous for fake interpreting Nelson Mandela's funeral — now he's plugging an Israeli start-up

South Africa was mortified when it discovered it allowed a sign language interpreter on stage next to world leader to sign what amounted to mere gibberish. The situation got worse when reports emerged he had been connected with criminal behavior. But the man at the center of the controversy is a star once more. That and more in today's Global Scan.