India

Global Scan

For the British, burning the White House 200 years ago is cause for a cake and sparklers

So just how did the British Embassy choose to celebrate its friendship with the US on Sunday? With a cake commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Brits burning down the White House during the War of 1812. It apologized on Monday. Meanwhile, the Ice Bucket Challenge, which has taken social media by storm, is getting its own challenge. And how much could an old comic book sell for? Try $3.2 million.

Global Scan

Groupon, step aside. Now, you can fly like a billionaire — on the cheap

The Internet makes all things possible, like finding and hiring a private jet that just happens to be going your way ... for a song. Meanwhile, Delhi police are urging citizens to use their smartphones to catch abusive police. And an "e-coyote" explains why he wants the clients he smuggles across the US-Mexico border to post on Facebook, all in today's Global Scan.

How new technologies are bringing water to the developing world

The introduction of better water management and water technology can change lives in places like Sub Saharan Africa. And it’s not just Sub Saharan Africa where water is a problem. The United Nations estimates that three-quarters of a billion people lack access to clean water and that almost two-point-five billion lack access to adequate sanitation. One solution to the problem may be through innovation and technology. Here's a look at three that are trying to make a difference.

Water scarcity heightens tensions between India and Pakistan

In 2013, the Asian Development Bank declared Pakistan as one of the most “water-stressed” countries in the world. One of the hardest hit areas is the Sindh province, in the northernmost region of Pakistan. It shares a border with India. This land is mostly desert so migration in search of water is a way of life. Those who live here say that India is making their life harder and could be a source of conflict between the two countries.

Lifestyle & Belief

Does the West have a monopoly on romantic love?

Updated

Is love, romantic love, a universal emotion? In the West, it often seems we live, die and even kill for love. Love is passionate, foolish and cherished. But in many cultures, arranged marriages are the norm and romantic love is, well, disruptive. It turns out people across the globe feel romantic love, but they don't necessarily act on it.

Global Scan

All the king's horses and all the king's men couldn't get Rob Ford out of office — again

Rob Ford is nothing if not a survivor. After being accused of patronizing prostitutes — a charge he denies — drinking and driving — a charge he admits to — and then making the sort of sexual comment that can't be repeated on a family-friendly website, he still hangs onto his job as mayor. Meanwhile, in Europe, it seems that in-flight phone calls may become OK. "Can you hear me now?" Ugh. Plus more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

This is a message for US drone pilots: we are not bugs

How do you let drone pilots dropping bombs by remote control know the consequences of their actions? Some Afghan artists are using a giant photo. And a journalist now claims the US didn't attack Syria's government after evidence of chemical warfare emerged because it may not have been Assad's fault. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.