Germany

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'The Hong Kong we are living in today is not the Hong Kong we knew'

The British handed Hong Kong to China 17 years ago today. And the anniversary meant many thousands of residents made their annual protest claiming the country has gone downhill ever since. Meanwhile, a lawmaker claims Pakistan is not convicting any rapists. And the US makes a step toward eliminating its land mines ... in 20 years. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Was the Taj Mahal built out of love ... or guilt?

The well-known story of the Taj Mahal is that a bereft emperor built it to honor his wife, who died in childbirth. But a new play in India suggests otherwise. In Brazil, some are analyzing the more prosaic plot lines that played out in Thursday's US-Germany World Cup match. And a young Jewish writer joins a gay pilgrimage to Israel, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Global Scan

Facebook plus drones equals Internet?

Facebook seems poised to bring Internet to the world, quite literally. The company is reported to be on the verge of buying a drone manufacturer to do just that. That, however, wasn't what led the pope to utter a rather coarse profanity in front of a large audience over the weekend. His F-bomb was actually just a mistake in pronunciation. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.